USAID Impact Photo Credit: USAID and Partners

Tag archives for pacific islands

Charting a Course Toward Pacific Climate Resiliency

Resistant to punctures and ultraviolet rays, these sturdy, multiple-ply sand bags discreetly work double time as they protect the coastline while preserving the shore’s natural look. / C-CAP

Low-lying island communities are among the most vulnerable to climate change. Through small-scale infrastructure projects in the Pacific Islands, USAID is helping them to adapt.

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Battling Climate Change’s Most Powerful Punches

A common sight in Vunisinu and Nalase villages in Fiji—worn out concrete stilts as a result of flooding in the villages

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry describes climate change as “the greatest challenge of our generation.” In the Pacific Islands, USAID is working with communities to come up with the most effective solutions to climate change.

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10 Ways the U.S. Government is Fighting Global Climate Change (that you’ve never heard about)

Photo Credit: Daniel Byers, SkyShip Films 2011

Fighting lake burst in Nepal, using Nasa data to monitor forest cover, building climate smart cities in coastal Asia. Read about these and other ways the U.S. Government is hard at work helping protect our planet and the billions of people who share it.

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Working to Preserve the Coral Triangle

CTI_01

Scientists warn that, by the year 2030, virtually all coral reefs in the Coral Triangle Region will be threatened by ocean warming and acidification, and human activities. Read more >>

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Designing for Women: The Mobile Challenge

smartphones

Imagine if you picked up a smartphone and didn’t know how to use it. What must it be like to have such a powerful device in the palm of your hand and not be able to utilize it? For many technically illiterate women in the developing world, navigating a smartphone or even a more basic feature phone is a real challenge. Read more>>

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