Liberia is in the midst of a building boom to help control the spread of Ebola. In support of the Liberian Government’s Ebola response strategy, the United States is in the process of constructing 15 Ebola treatment units (ETUs) in this hard-hit nation. Across the country, teams of workers are busy moving dirt, laying concrete, trucking in construction materials, and erecting large white tents.

The first ETU to be built and staffed by the U.S.—in the city of Tubmanburg—started receiving patients on November 18. Now, a second ETU supported by the United States is operational in the city of Kakata, about 45 miles northeast of Monrovia. Built by the organization Save the Children with support from USAID, the ETU is being run by International Medical Corps (IMC), which is also managing another ETU in Bong County, Liberia.

Members of USAID’s Ebola Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) visited the site on November 22, joining a Liberian delegation that included the Assistant Minister of Health and county health officials. Below is an inside look at the USAID-supported ETU, including those areas that are currently off limits to cameras now that the facility is open to Ebola patients.

11.22.14-Kakata-ETU-sign-photo-credit-Justin-Pendarvis-USAID-OFDA About an hour’s drive northeast of Monrovia, in the heart of Liberia’s rubber cultivation belt, the second Ebola treatment unit (ETU) in Liberia to be constructed and staffed with U.S. Government assistance is now receiving patients. / Justin Pendarvis, USAID/OFDA


The facility was built by Save the Children with USAID providing construction materials, gravel, cots for patients, generators to power the ETU, and other support.  The red fencing separates public areas from Ebola “hot zones.” Photo courtesy: Justin Pendarvis, USAID/OFDA The facility was built by Save the Children with USAID providing construction materials, gravel, cots for patients, generators to power the ETU, and other support. The red fencing separates public areas from Ebola “hot zones.” / Justin Pendarvis, USAID/OFDA


USAID is funding International Medical Corps (IMC) to operate the ETU in Kakata. Here, USAID Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) Deputy Justin Pendarvis (left) gets a tour from IMC Emergency Response Team Director Sean Casey (right). / Alisha McMichael, USAID/OFDA USAID is funding International Medical Corps (IMC) to operate the ETU in Kakata. Here, USAID Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) Deputy Justin Pendarvis (left) gets a tour from IMC Emergency Response Team Director Sean Casey (right). / Alisha McMichael, USAID/OFDA


More than 160 people—mostly Liberian national staff—work at the ETU. For the past two weeks, IMC’s medical team received rigorous training on Ebola patient care, safety protocols, and ETU management. Photo courtesy: Alisha McMichael, USAID/OFDA More than 160 people—mostly Liberian national staff—work at the ETU. For the past two weeks, IMC’s medical team received rigorous training on Ebola patient care, safety protocols, and ETU management. / Alisha McMichael, USAID/OFDA


The 88-bed ETU, which opened on November 22, has received a number of patients. Some were discharged after testing negative for Ebola. Photo courtesy: Alisha McMichael, USAID/OFD The 88-bed ETU, which opened on November 22, has received a number of patients. Some were discharged after testing negative for Ebola. / Alisha McMichael, USAID/OFD


NO DETAIL OVERLOOKED: Inside the clinical care areas are electrical outlets where patients can play music or charge their cell phones to keep in touch with their loved ones. USAID provided generators to power the ETU. / IMC NO DETAIL OVERLOOKED: Inside the clinical care areas are electrical outlets where patients can play music or charge their cell phones to keep in touch with their loved ones. USAID provided generators to power the ETU. / IMC

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

The Ebola Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) is overseeing the U.S. Ebola response efforts in West Africa. The DART includes staff from across the U.S. Government, including USAID’s Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Departments of Defense and Health and Human Services.

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