USAID Impact Photo Credit: USAID and Partners

Archives for 2014

Lessons Learned a Decade after the Indian Ocean Tsunami

The December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was one of the worst natural disasters in recorded history, destroying lives, homes, and livelihoods. In the disaster’s immediate aftermath, USAID provided emergency support in the form of food, shelter, water, sanitation, and medical supplies. In the years that followed, USAID has continued to work alongside survivors to help affected communities rebuild and create jobs.

Ten years ago today the Indian Ocean tsunami hit land in Aceh province, Indonesia. As we mark this tragic anniversary, we also reflect on some valuable lessons learned about how we respond to disasters. Here are five.

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Why Strengthening Civil Society Matters + Co-Creating Solutions Rocks

Workshop participant Josh Machleder of Internews uses a creative prop during the “product in a box” exercise explaining how to nurture civil society activism under restrictive conditions. / Reboot

The DRG Center is using the Global Development Lab’s new Development Innovation Accelerator to do better, more innovative programming. In September 2014, President Obama charged USAID with developing six networked regional civil society innovation centers all over the world. USAID used the DIA to have a huge co-creation meeting with over 60 stakeholders to co-design the initiative.

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A Spotlight on the World’s ‘Invisible’ Workers

Haitian construction workers in the Dominican Republic include an estimated 900,000 to 1.2 million undocumented migrants. The USAID Global Labor Program is supporting research and advocacy for international standards to protect their rights. / Ricardo Rojas

The world’s 232 million migrant workers bring wealth, infrastructure and services to a globalizing world. But they also fall outside of human rights norms and are often victims of exploitation. Read how USAID has elevated the profile of some of the world’s most invisible workers.

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A Look into the Hot Zone of Sierra Leone’s New Ebola Clinic


“Death is always difficult,” said Elizabeth Stevens, a nurse from Freetown, Sierra Leone.
At her new job, Stevens is forced to confront this stark reality every day, and in a way that she never has before.

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South Sudan’s People Deserve Peace

USAID food commodities are distributed at U.N. House Protection of Civilians (POC) site in Juba, where more than 32,000 people are seeking shelter. / K. Donovan, UNICEF

As leaders of U.S. humanitarian efforts, we contend with a long list of global disasters, conflicts and disease outbreaks. Yet none fills us with as much frustration and despair as the crisis in South Sudan. Why? Because this crisis should never have happened.

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Delivering More Bang for Development Bucks: Cost-Benefit Analysis and Feed the Future

Seventeen kilometers of improved roads in the Haitian mountain community of Fond-Baptiste now provide easy access to this local Monday market and larger markets on the coast. / Steve Goertz

USAID’s renewed focus on data-driven analysis, particularly cost-benefit analysis, and the resulting collaboration with Feed the Future are bearing fruit for USAID beneficiaries.

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Ending Extreme Poverty in Asia through Universal Health Coverage

A woman in the Philippines receives a tetanus shot during a pre-natal visit. / HealthPRO

Despite the region’s robust economic growth, over 60 percent of those in extreme poverty still live in Asia. Partnering with countries to invest in Universal Health Coverage will boost the critical economic growth and social safety nets needed to eliminate extreme poverty.

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Breaking Invisible Barriers in the West Bank and Gaza

USAID supports girls’ education in the West Bank. The Agency built the new Nahalin Secondary Girls' School in the Bethlehem Governorate / Credit Alaa Badarneh

USAID gender chief Susan Markham shares stories of her recent trip to the West Bank and why improving opportunities for women and girls is the key for a brighter future for all.

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South Sudan: The Threat of Worsening Hunger

Residents of Bor County receive sorghum, oil, and lentils in exchange for road construction work they completed as part of the Catholic Relief Services led Jonglei Food Security Program, in Jonglei, South Sudan. / CRS

Last week, 21,000 metric tons of American-grown sorghum were offloaded in Port Sudan to respond to the ongoing hunger crisis in South Sudan. While USAID is taking every measure to respond to the crisis, the best way to avert a future famine is for the combatants to stop fighting.

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A ‘Daily’ Struggle for Human Rights


December 10 marks International Human Rights Day and the 66th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. USAID joins the world and all those who struggle for the realization and protection of their human rights.

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