USAID Impact Photo Credit: USAID and Partners

Tag archives for WFP

South Sudan: The Threat of Worsening Hunger

Residents of Bor County receive sorghum, oil, and lentils in exchange for road construction work they completed as part of the Catholic Relief Services led Jonglei Food Security Program, in Jonglei, South Sudan. / CRS

Last week, 21,000 metric tons of American-grown sorghum were offloaded in Port Sudan to respond to the ongoing hunger crisis in South Sudan. While USAID is taking every measure to respond to the crisis, the best way to avert a future famine is for the combatants to stop fighting.

Read the rest of this entry »

Assistance Supports Dignity for Syrian Refugees, Markets for Jordan

Ambassador Lane observes the process of registering refugees to enable them to receive food vouchers

Despite a strong desire to help, Jordanians are understandably concerned about the resources required to support their needs.

Read the rest of this entry »

No Longer Just Food: Communities Create Assets to Build Food Security in South Sudan

Woman in South Sudan. Photo credit: USAID

U.S. government food assistance programs are providing vital timely assistance to food insecure South Sudanese. Read more >>

Read the rest of this entry »

Having the Right Tools at the Right Time to Meet Food Assistance Needs

Flour made from Turkish wheat purchased for the Syria response. Photo credit: State Department

Using resources available under its Emergency Food Security Program, USAID strives to respond to crises to best meet the needs of vulnerable populations. Read more >>

Read the rest of this entry »

Food Voucher Program Gives Palestinian Families Choices and Supports the Local Economy

Thanks to the USAID/WFP voucher card system, families can purchase the basic foods they need most. Photo credit: WFP/Quique Kierszenbaum

A food assistance voucher program in West Bank provides more than food to Palestinian families.

Read the rest of this entry »

U.S. Provides Wheat to Fill Urgent Food Gaps in Syria

An American ship arrives in Beirut, Lebanon with enough wheat to feed more than one million people affected by Syria’s ongoing crisis. Photo credit: WFP/Laure Chadraoui

U.S. support is helping the World Food Program work toward feeding 2.5 million people inside Syria, and more than one million refugees in neighboring countries.

Read the rest of this entry »

Video of the Week: Raj Shah in Jordan

USAID Administrator Dr. Rajiv Shah announces additional humanitarian assistance in response to the ongoing violence in Syria while visiting the Za’atri refugee camp in Jordan with Jaafar Hassan, Jordanian Minister of Planning and International Cooperation. The United States is committed to helping the innocent children, women, and men affected by the ongoing conflict in Syria. […]

Read the rest of this entry »

Working with Our Partners to Lead the Fight Against Global Hunger

Yesterday, we celebrated Howard Buffett and Bill Gates as recipients of the World Food Program USA’s 10th Annual George McGovern Leadership Awards for their extraordinary efforts to fight global hunger. Their work and vision is exemplary, and USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah joined a panel at the Global Hunger Conference to discuss how leadership and thoughtful partnerships […]

Read the rest of this entry »

This Week at USAID – June 7, 2010

Currently leading the U.S. delegation to the UN World Food Programme (WFP) Executive Board meeting in Rome, today Administrator Shah meets with the Executive Director of WFP, Deputy Director Generals of the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, and the President of International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD). Earl Gast will be sworn-in as the new […]

Read the rest of this entry »

A Visit to Otash Camp

An early a.m. flight brought us to Juba in south Sudan. We swapped planes at the airport and headed straight for Nyala, the capital of South Darfur. After arriving, we met up with the World Food Programme (WFP) and visited an IDP camp called Otash. USAID, through the WFP and its NGO partners like World […]

Read the rest of this entry »