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Tag archives for Sahel

Study Highlights Way Forward for African Higher Education Institutions

Students in the Tabia Debre Abay community at an Alternative Basic Education Center in Tigray, Ethiopia. The community is now actively involved in the education of their youngsters. Photo by Nena Terrell, USAID

Leadership and administration capacity are the most critical challenges in the effort to make higher education in sub-Saharan Africa more effective and responsive to development, while ensuring its quality and relevance. Read more >>

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West African Nations Unite to Build Coastal Resilience to Climate Change

Panel discussion with representatives from Ghana, Benin and Cote d’Ivoire. Photo credit: Adiza Ama Owusu

In June, government officials from 11 West African nations kicked off a regional coordination effort to reduce vulnerability to climate change. Read more >>

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Fields of Hope in Burkina Faso

Women in Kofogou repairing a dike. Photo credit: USAID

Green fields in Burkina Faso are bringing hope to thousands of families, even during the dry season. Read more >>

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Storify Features This Week at USAID

mavc storify

This week has been a busy one at USAID Headquarters in Washington, D.C.! Read more >>

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Helping Families Build Resilience and a Better Future for Kids

Carolyn Miles and Moussa in Diema, Mali in August 2012. Photo Credit: Save the Children

Whenever I’m asked to describe the scale of the hunger crisis in the Sahel, I see Moussa’s face. I met him in August during a trip to Mali when he was two months old, but he was so small and frail that I worried he would die in my arms. Read more >>

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Does the New Resilience Policy Have Staying Power?

Villages that have received Mercy Corps training and initial seeds to build community gardens are faring much better than other villages in the region that have not. They have a wide variety of produce they can use to feed their families, as well as excess to sell in the local markets. Photo Credit: Cassandra Nelson, Mercy Corp

The global “resilience” agenda is exciting – and overdue. The idea that aid should invest not just in responding to crises, but also in preventing, mitigating, and helping people adapt to them, has been around for a long time. Read more >>

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Chronic Crisis in the Sahel Calls for a New Approach

Originally published in the Huffington Post. It is the lean season in the Sahel, a spine of arid and dry lands that runs from Senegal to Chad in western Africa, and once again we are seeing the devastating images of children gaunt with hunger. This is a region that faces high childhood malnutrition and underdevelopment […]

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Responding to Acute Malnutrition in the Sahel

I recently returned from Niger and Mauritania, in Africa’s Sahel region, assessing nutrition-focused humanitarian assistance.  This was not my first trip to the region, as I was also there with USAID in 2010 when a failed harvest and poor pasture conditions led to food insecurity conditions nationwide and a significant rise in acute malnutrition among […]

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Moving Food Faster to Those Who Need it Most in the Sahel

This week, urgently needed food – 33,700 tons of sorghum from American farmers – will depart the United States for West Africa, as a part of the U.S. Government’s response to the drought in the Sahel. Due to poor harvests, high food prices, and a number of conflicts in the region, a dire humanitarian situation […]

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Responding Early and Building Resilience in the Sahel

Originally posted at Huffington Post. In the village of Tougouri, in Burkina Faso, I stood with the four women squinting in the sun. They each held a digging tool. Between them, they had 31 children and no husbands. Safieta, wearing a bright yellow scarf, noted the rains were bad last year. No, she said, none […]

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