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Tag archives for Resilience

Storify Features This Week at USAID

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This week has been a busy one at USAID Headquarters in Washington, D.C.! Read more >>

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Helping Families Build Resilience and a Better Future for Kids

Carolyn Miles and Moussa in Diema, Mali in August 2012. Photo Credit: Save the Children

Whenever I’m asked to describe the scale of the hunger crisis in the Sahel, I see Moussa’s face. I met him in August during a trip to Mali when he was two months old, but he was so small and frail that I worried he would die in my arms. Read more >>

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Resilience: Safety Net for Reducing Hunger and Malnutrition

David Beckmann is President of Bread for the World

Over the last month, we have watched communities along the New York and New Jersey coastline begin to rebuild from the devastating impact of Hurricane Sandy. It is a reminder that we are all vulnerable to natural disasters that can happen at any time. How communities survive and recover from these shocks depends very much on their resilience Read more >>

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Putting People at the Heart of Resilience

Since 2000, it is estimated that floods, cyclones, tsunamis, earthquakes and other natural hazards have cost the world more than $1 trillion. These disasters have triggered significant social, ecological and economic devastation well beyond their immediate points of impact. Read more >>

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Does the New Resilience Policy Have Staying Power?

Villages that have received Mercy Corps training and initial seeds to build community gardens are faring much better than other villages in the region that have not. They have a wide variety of produce they can use to feed their families, as well as excess to sell in the local markets. Photo Credit: Cassandra Nelson, Mercy Corp

The global “resilience” agenda is exciting – and overdue. The idea that aid should invest not just in responding to crises, but also in preventing, mitigating, and helping people adapt to them, has been around for a long time. Read more >>

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Got Milk? 300,000 Kenyan Dairy Farmers Do

As a Dairy Value Chain Coordinator, I help Kenyan farmers apply innovative ideas and technologies to increase milk production by changing the way they manage their dairy cows.  I’m able to do this through the USAID-supported Kenya Dairy Sector Competitiveness Program, which aims to increase the quantity and quality of milk produced by smallholder farmers, […]

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From Conflict to Coping

Tisda, Mercy Corps Program Officer, in Ethiopia

Last summer, amidst the Horn of Africa’s worst drought in generations, Mercy Corps received encouraging news from local officials in the Somali-Oromiya region of Ethiopia.  In this area – long known for conflict, scarce resources and harsh conditions – communities that had participated in USAID-supported Mercy Corps peacebuilding efforts were reportedly coping better than they […]

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Pre-positioned Plastic Sheeting Hastens Recovery in Madagascar

When Tropical Cyclone Giovanna slammed into the eastern coast of Madagascar on Valentine’s Day, relief agencies recognized the storm as a potentially catastrophic event — but not an unpredictable one. Dangerous cyclones are not unusual for the Indian Ocean island: cyclones and tropical storms affect Madagascar almost every year. Giovanna’s strong winds destroyed more than […]

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My 2012 Annual Letter: Elevating Development within America’s Foreign Policy

About a year ago, I decided to write an annual letter to share some of the work our Agency does saving lives and improving human welfare around the world. I also wanted to describe some of the priorities we’ve set and tough choices we’ve made in order to deliver meaningful results for and on behalf […]

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Responding Early and Building Resilience in the Sahel

Originally posted at Huffington Post. In the village of Tougouri, in Burkina Faso, I stood with the four women squinting in the sun. They each held a digging tool. Between them, they had 31 children and no husbands. Safieta, wearing a bright yellow scarf, noted the rains were bad last year. No, she said, none […]

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