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Tag archives for Nutrition

Improving Nutrition, Building Resilience for Families, Societies

Uganda is one of the fastest growing economies in Africa. Feed the Future is helping increase opportunities for smallholder farmers like Alice Monigo in Uganda by providing trainings for women. /CNFA

Improving nutrition is one of the best investments we can make in development. For the past year, humanitarian, development and health experts from across USAID worked to craft a new approach to nutrition, aimed at increasing food security, reducing malnutrition and building resilience among vulnerable populations like those in the Sahel.

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The Power of Household Consumption and Expenditure Surveys (HCES) to Inform Evidence-Based Nutrition Interventions and Policies

Conducting Household Consumption and Expenditure Surveys (HCES)

Understanding food consumption patterns and nutrient intakes is essential for informing evidence-based food and nutrition policies. The international food and nutrition community, however, faces a lack of accurate and reliable data.

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Could Your Business Benefit from Collaborating with Feed the Future? Find Out

So, you’re interested in how your business can team up with the Feed the Future initiative. Or, maybe you’re just a food or agriculture business with resources, expertise, and a desire to help the poor and expand into new markets.

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Giving Thanks for Progress in the Fight Against Global Hunger

A young boy in Tajikistan eats a healthy lunch. Photo credit: USAID

We’re thankful for the opportunity to be a part of a collective global effort to end poverty and hunger around the world. Read more >>

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Video of the Week: Partnering to Feed the Future in Ethiopia

CNFA

As part of USAID’s 52nd birthday celebration, we highlight one partnership that is helping to improve nutrition in Ethiopia. Read more >>

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Meet the Experts: New Fellow Helps Feed the Future Apply Lessons Learned in Scaling Health Care Innovations to Agriculture

Smallholder farmer agricultural technologies, like irrigation, increase production and productivity of crops, like bananas in Zimbabwe. Photo credit: Bill Wamisley

Meet Jon Colton, a new Jefferson Science Fellow with USAID, who will support the Feed the Future initiative’s work to scale up promising technologies that help smallholder farmers improve global food security. Read more >>

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Smarter, Healthier, Wealthier – Helping Rural Cambodians Live Better Lives

School kids in Kampong Thom learn about the importance of sanitation and have access to clean water at school through USAID’s support. Photo: USAID/Michael Gebremedhin

Agriculture is of huge importance to Cambodia and USAID’s support is helping farmers become more successful by introducing new techniques. Read more >>

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Celebrating the Richness of Uzbekistan’s Harvest

Rural children enjoy prize-winning fruits of the Ferghana Valley at a USAID-sponsored agricultural contest. Photo Credit: U.S. Embassy in Tashkent, Uzbekistan

A USAID program economist recounts his recent trip to Uzbekistan, where he witnessed the rich abundance of Uzbekistan’s land. Read more >>

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Optifood: A New Tool to Improve Diets and Prevent Child Malnutrition in Guatemala

Woman tends to crops. Photo credit: INCAP

Through the help of multiple partners, including WHO and FANTA, and collaboration between the U.S. Government and the Government of Guatemala, USAID is working towards improving children’s diets in the region. Read more >>

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The Issue of Inequalities: A Look at the Underlying Causes of Maternal and Child Death in Latin America and the Caribbean

PromiseRenewed

Eliminating preventable maternal, newborn and child deaths globally is an overarching goal of USAID’s work, so we must address the underlying causes. Read more >>

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