USAID Impact Photo Credit: USAID and Partners

Tag archives for Morocco

The Cost of Corruption

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Many consider corruption to be an unavoidable cost of doing business around the Middle East and North Africa. Through efforts such as our partnership with Transparency International, we are helping to lay the long-term foundations for a successful transition to democracy around the Middle East.

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Building Skills and Promoting Collaboration among the Middle East and North Africa’s Budding Journalists

Journalists from Jordan, Lebanon and Morocco discuss a collaborative research project at a regional training program organized by USAID and ICFJ in Rabat, Morocco. (Photo: Frank Folwell, ICFJ)

The success of the democratic transitions underway around the Middle East and North Africa will depend on well-informed voters educated by a professional and objective media.

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In Morocco, Perseverance and Good Luck Ensure Three Young Boys a Quality Education

By Dr. Helen Boyle, Associate Professor in Educational Leadership and Policy at Florida State University In early December education leaders, donors and partners met to discuss and plan for the future of early grade education in the Middle East and North Africa at the All Children Learning Workshop in Rabat, Morocco. Youssef, Moustafa and Redouan were lucky boys.  […]

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Access to Water Empowers Women in Morocco’s Middle Atlas

Increased access to water changes women and girls' lives in Morocco. Photo credit: USAID

By working directly with local partners, our assistance is amplified far beyond the water tap. Read more >>

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From The Field: Getting Creative in Supporting Local Governance

Former USAID/Morocco Mission Director, John Groarke (left), speaks with members of the youth council and local press. Photo credit: USAID

Building a democratic, constitutional state is critical for lasting peace and stability. Read more >>

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Free Press: The Cornerstone of Democracy

In Mozambique, USAID supports the five-year, $10 million Media Strengthening Program to promote a free, open, diverse, and self-sustaining media sector. Photo Credit: IREX

Today and every day, USAID applauds the brave work of journalists, editors, and the increasing millions of “citizen reporters” throughout the world in their common pursuit to freely gather, report, analyze, and share news. Read more >>

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USAID in the Middle East: Using Data to Improve Regional Water Management (Part 1)

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Few places are drier than the Middle East and North Africa. Host to 5 percent of the world’s population, the region has only 1 percent of the world’s renewable fresh water.

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Giving Youth a Real Voice in Development

This past May, youth leaders convene with Moroccan government representatives to offer recommendations on  the new Consultative Council for Youth and Community Work. Photo Credit: USAID Morocco Local Governance Program

Giving youth real decision-making power and leadership roles in development processes and programs is a challenge in practice. Read more >>

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Unlocking the Potential of Moroccan Youth

I recently returned from a week-long trip to Morocco where USAID brought together the heads of our offices from across the Arab world to reflect on how we can and should adjust our work in response to the Arab Spring. Among the many themes we discussed was the central role of youth in the recent […]

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How do Moroccan Youth Make Change Happen?

Submitted by Matthew Johnson On the final day of breakout sessions during Morocco’s Ramadan Youth Outreach event, the discussions focused on being involved in local government.  The morning started off with a round table discussion with seven youth leaders of NGOs.  The afternoon session was a discussion with elected officials on how young people can […]

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