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Tag archives for Haiti earthquake

Haiti’s Recovery Won’t Happen Overnight

A row of damaged houses and buildings in the Cité Soleil neighborhood in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Four years after the disaster, almost 75 percent of earthquake rubble has been removed and 89 percent of the 1.5 million displaced population have left camps for alternative housing options.

As Haiti leaves behind the era of post-earthquake relief and focuses now on longer-term development, USAID is striving to build the capacity of local organizations to lead and manage development initiatives.

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Housing Development Fuels New Hope for Haitian Families

A beneficiary prepares to move her belongings into her new USAID-funded house near Cabaret, Haiti, in September 2013. Photo credit: USAID

Many of whom lost houses, as a result of the 2010 Haiti earthquake, now have permanent homes thanks to a USAID partnership. Read more >>

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Demographic and Health Survey Show Positive Results in Haiti

Patients get laboratory work done at a USAID-supported health clinic in Ouanaminthe, Haiti (May 15, 2013). Photo credit: Kendra Helmer/USAID

A newly released nationwide health survey of Haiti shows continuing positive trends on key health-care indicators in particular those of Haitian women and children. Read more >>

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Rebuilding Haiti One Concrete Block at a Time

Luis Garcia speaks about the importance of basic building materials like concrete when he described his work in Haiti to an OPIC delegation in February 2013. Photo credit: OPIC

Governments, private businesses and NGOs all have an important role in the rebuild of homes, roads and even an airport runway in Haiti. Read more >>

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Helping Haiti Recover Three Years Later

On Monday, March 4, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack met with Haiti’s Minister of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Rural Development Thomas Jacques who outlined his three year strategic plan for revitalization of the Haitian agriculture sector. Photo credit: USDA

Three years after the earthquake, USDA and USAID continue to help the Haitian agricultural sector recover. Read more >>

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USAID Visits U.S. Navy “Comfort” and Continues Joint Support of Disaster Response

USNS Comfort

Visiting the Comfort provided the opportunity for a firsthand view of the capacity and capabilities of the hospital ship, knowledge that provides USAID staff with a foundation for future decisions on crisis or disaster response. Read more >>

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FrontLines Year in Review: Beyond Port-au-Prince

Vendors sell their wares March 24, 2011, at a market in Cap-Haïtien, Haiti. Photo credit: Kendra Helmer, USAID.

The United States and Haitian Governments aim to develop areas outside the country’s overcrowded capital, catalyzing growth in the north. Read more >>

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A New Milestone in Child Protection

Children at a school damaged by the earthquake in Port-au-Prince, Haiti in 2010.  USAID, through the International Medical Corps, helped ensure that children were safe and protected when attending classes. Photo credit: Ron Libby, Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance

Disasters impact the lives of hundreds of millions of people around the world every year. Half of those affected are children, who often bear the biggest brunt of humanitarian crises. Nowhere have we seen this more clearly than in the wake of the January 2010 Haiti earthquake. Read more >>

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Progress in Haiti

Haiti is working tirelessly to overcome adversity that existed even before the earthquake and to begin to build a stable and sustainable foundation for economic prosperity and societal stability. Read more >>

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Picture of the Week: Progress in Haiti

Josette Colin

Josette Colin discusses how her earthquake-damaged home was made habitable again by USAID/OFDA-funded project. Read more >>

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