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Archives for Youth

New Mobile Clinics Take to the Road in Lesotho

This originally appeared on the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation Blog.

Last month, the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF) teamed up with the Lesotho Ministry of Health (MOH) to launch two mobile health care clinics that will provide HIV/AIDS and other health care services to residents in Lesotho’s rural communities. On July 11, EGPAF’s Chief Operating Officer (COO) Brad Kiley joined representatives from the Lesotho MOH and other high-level government officials at a ceremony to celebrate the new mobile units and how they will improve access to health care services to people throughout the country. The clinics are made possible thanks to generous support from the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).

Representatives from the Lesotho Ministry of Health, USAID, and EGPAF – including EGPAF COO Brad Kiley (in orange tie) – at a launch for two mobile clinics in Lesotho. Photo credit: EGPAF

Kiley noted that he is particularly proud of EGPAF’s success in Lesotho and is grateful for the kindness and support of the Government of Lesotho and the Ministry of Health. He also acknowledged and thanked USAID on behalf of the Foundation for its generous contributions to the key project of Strengthening Clinical Services in Lesotho.

Speaking at the same ceremony on behalf of the Health Minister, Principal Secretary to the Ministry of Health, Lefu Manyokole, said the mobile clinics come at the right time, when the Ministry is revitalizing primary health care and trying to strengthen the health system. He also commended the partnership and continued support EGPAF is giving to the Government of Lesotho.

He continued by emphasizing the MOH’s commitment to properly maintain and carefully coordinate the use of these mobile clinics so that they are effectively used for strengthening linkages and helping malnourished people in the region.

EGPAF will work with the MOH to provide integrated health services to patients in the remote areas of the mountainous districts of Thaba-Tseka and Mohale’s Hoek, where there is a high prevalence of HIV among pregnant women along with high rates of malnutrition among children and overall limited access to maternal, neonatal, and pediatric care. Each mobile clinic is equipped with two consulting rooms with collapsible examination couches, a metal stairway and emergency/wheelchair pathway, air conditioning, and built-in generators. Initially, services will include HIV/AIDS testing and treatment, prevention of the mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) services, nutrition counseling, and other maternal and child health services.

These services are part of a larger effort by EGPAF and the Partnership for HIV-Free Survival (PHFS) and Nutrition Assessment Counseling Support (NACS) program to reduce malnutrition in the region, especially in HIV-positive women and children.

EGPAF has been active in promoting the use of mobile clinics throughout Africa. To learn more, click here.

To learn more about our work in Lesotho, click here.

Mapalesa Lemeke is Communications Officer for the Foundation, based in Lesotho.

From the Field in Lebanon: Learning that Water Is Everyone’s Responsibility

I found myself transported back to childhood as I cheered with a group of boys and girls in a school auditorium. We were watching a USAID-sponsored puppet show, “Chasing after Water,” which ran in schools and public libraries in nine cities and villages across the Bekaa region of Lebanon.

Located 30 km east of the capital, Beirut, and part of the Litani River Basin, the Bekaa is the Lebanon’s central agricultural valley. The entire area has suffered from depletion of the water table due to unsustainable agricultural practices and individual water-use habits. Efficient management of the region’s water resources is paramount. It is also a region that has hosted large numbers of those that have sought refuge from the crisis in Syria.

The king of the puppets considers solutions for water shortage, during a USAID-sponsored performance in the Bekaa, Lebanon. The shows were part of USAID’s partnership with the Lebanese government to increase awareness about water conservation. Photo credit: USAID

The king of the puppets considers solutions for water shortage, during a USAID-sponsored performance in the Bekaa, Lebanon. The shows were part of USAID’s partnership with the Lebanese government to increase awareness about water conservation. Photo credit: USAID

To help raise awareness about this need, USAID’s Litani River Basin Management Support program collaborated with the Litani River Authority to put on a series of activities, including the puppet show I attended. Around 5,000 children between the ages of 6 and 11 attended the shows, in addition to 100 children with special needs.

The show starts by telling the story of a king who is concerned about a water shortage in his kingdom. He embarks on a mission to find the root of the problem and — eventually — a proper solution. With the help of a loyal citizen, he traces the causes of the shortage: water pollution and absence of water conservation practices. The children in the audience watched with great enthusiasm and were eager to hear about the solution. As it turns out, that solution lies in the hands of consumers, young and old.

As part of each performance, children were called on-stage to participate in a role-playing activity that emphasized the show’s theme: that it is everyone’s responsibility to conserve water. At the end, students heartily sang a jingle and took home a booklet with water-related games they could play with their families.

كلنا مسؤولين؟ ايه! مسؤولين كلنا!

كلنا بالهوا سوا وأكيد بمايتنا!

Are we all responsible? Yes, we are all responsible!

We are all in this together … when it comes to our water too!

— Refrain from the “Chasing after Water” jingle

Children got to be on-stage during the shows, playing games that helped reinforce the messages about their role in responsible water use. Photo credit: USAID

Children got to be on-stage during the shows, playing games that helped reinforce the messages about their role in responsible water use. Photo credit: USAID

The students’ enthusiasm as they learned about managing their water consumption habits and protecting water resources confirms the importance of initiating awareness in early life. Such initiatives complement USAID’s other efforts to develop infrastructure that will improve water service delivery for all Lebanese citizens.

My journey back to innocence continued as I sang the jingle myself as we drove back from the school. I was even prompted to share the water conservation tips with my 9-year-old daughter and start practicing them in our home. So, we are also reinforcing the program’s message that “water is everyone’s responsibility.”

The USAID Litani River Basin Management Support is four-year program that supports more efficient and sustainable water resource management in Lebanon’s Litani River Basin. Learn more about USAID’s work in Lebanon

International Youth Day: Young People Are Key to Solving Global Challenges

This originally appeared on Dipnote

Today, and every August, the world celebrates International Youth Day.

Young people are key drivers to solving some of the world’s most pressing strategic challenges, from rebuilding the global economy to peace building and creating sustainable democracies, and will play a prominent role in shaping the 21st century world. Around the world, we’ve seen young people use their voice to demand opportunity and respect, utilizing technology to connect to one another in ways that no generation has ever been able to before.

Throughout my travels, I’ve heard from young people what is important to them–opportunities for effective political engagement, access to education, the hope for meaningful employment, and the desire for a safe and healthy future for themselves and their families.

Special Adviser Rahman at the Global Young Leaders Conference. Photo credit: State Department

Special Adviser Rahman at the Global Young Leaders Conference. Photo credit: State Department

All of these issues are equally, if not more, important to young people who have been uprooted from their homelands and forced, or have chosen, to migrate to a new country for economic or political reasons.

This year, the focus on International Youth Day is youth migration. Every year, millions of young people enter crowded cities, looking for economic opportunity or fleeing political persecution. Migration affects all countries and presents both opportunities and challenges. It can be an opportunity for a more stable life or a chance for prosperity but it can also hamper young people’s access to education or leave them marginalized and vulnerable. It is imperative that we pay attention to the special challenges of these young migrants.

Addressing the challenges that youth face around the world — in education, employment, healthcare — is smart foreign policy. But it is also an opportunity; young people represent a pool of human capital whose potential has yet to be tapped. I am inspired by the energy and passion of this generation and am committed to working in partnership with them to solve some of our biggest global challenges.

Follow and join the conversation on Twitter using #IYD2013. 

Srebrenica Smiles

David Barth serves as Mission Director to Bosnia and Herzegovina

David Barth serves as Mission Director to Bosnia and Herzegovina

Srebrenica. For years, the name has been synonymous with tragedy. The massacre in Srebrenica marked the darkest moment in the blackest of wars.  During the second week of July, 1995, 8,000 Bosniak men and boys were slaughtered by paramilitaries of the Army of the Republika Srpska and 30,000 women and children were forcibly deported in an act called the worst crime on European soil since the Second World War. Eighteen years later, the wounds have barely begun to heal, if at all.

The town remains wracked by ethnic tensions. It remains the most economically depressed municipality in the country, with unemployment approaching 50%. The obstacles to economic growth are legion. Infrastructure, workforce skills, isolation, poor governance. And a major casualty of that is hope. One resident told me that because she’s from Srebrenica, it is expected by society that she never allow herself to be happy. Imagine the impact that has on children.

With that in mind the staff of USAID/Bosnia and Herzegovina set out to create one special day for the children of this remote town. NBA basketball player and star of the Bosnian national team Mirza Teletovic joined the mission at the Srebrenica International Peace Camp to spend quality time with the children of Srebrenica; to talk about sports, ecology, human rights, and most importantly, hope.

In addition to a basketball clinic featuring Mostar native Teletovic, USAID-grantee Eko Sports Group taught courses in water sports, including scuba and boating. Eko Sports Group is a marvel as well. Made up of disabled athletes, including landmine victims, the Eko Sports Group has made itself the country’s most prominent aquatic sports trainers. They provide a valuable service and are also tremendous role models on the power of perseverance.

The principal responsibility of our Mission is to administer precious foreign assistance resources in the most efficient manner to achieve tangible results. This is our core objective. But we are also in a position to promote our American values. So I was enormously proud to watch our team working with their hands to build a camp worthy of these kids. I think that you will see from this video that in this case, their smiles represent an overwhelming tangible result.

Learn more about our work in Bosnia and Herzegovina and like us on Facebook for ongoing stories and photos from the field.  

Video of the Week: Youth Initiatives in West Bank/Gaza

Yesterday was International Youth Day and this year focused on Youth Migration: Moving Development Forward. Created in 2000, the day brings attention to the challenges facing young people as well as their contributions to their communities, nations and the world. USAID is celebrating International Youth Day by reflecting on the linkages between youth migration and development, exploring the positive aspects of youth migration, and accounting for the risks and challenges young people frequently face when they migrate.

This week’s “Video of the Week” was produced by youth as part of the Ruwwad Youth Empowerment Project about USAID’s youth programming in the West Bank and Gaza. Ruwwad is implemented by the Education Development Center, Inc. (EDC) and funded by USAID.

Learn more about youth programming at USAID. Join the conversation on Twitter using #IYD2013. 

A Day to Celebrate Youth’s Contribution to Development

Today is International Youth Day, a day to celebrate youth and their numerous contributions to their communities, nations and the world.

The theme for 2013 is Youth Migration: Moving Development Forward. Many of you are familiar with the global statistics on youth–of the seven billion people on the planet, at least half are under the age of 30, and that youth and children comprise up to 70 percent of the population of many developing countries. But, are you aware of the statistics on migration?

Young people in the village of Bunyakiri, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). By helping young people to develop positive beliefs and attitudes, a USAID project can prevent future acts of violence, and can ultimately contribute to a more peaceful and equitable future for DRC. Photo credit: J. Harris, International Medical Corps

Young people in the village of Bunyakiri, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). By helping young people to develop positive beliefs and attitudes, a USAID project can prevent future acts of violence, and can ultimately contribute to a more peaceful and equitable future for DRC. Photo credit: J. Harris, International Medical Corps

Today, more people are on the move than at any time in history. As of 2010, 214 million people, or three percent of the world’s population, were living outside their countries of origin. Twenty-seven million of the international migrants are between the ages of ten and 24. The vast majority of these young migrants live in the developing world.

Many USAID programs support young migrants or potential migrants. This includes our anti-trafficking and human rights programs, which help mitigate the risks associated with migration. However, I would like to draw attention to our broader youth development programs, which aim to provide youth with the support structures, skills, knowledge and opportunities they need to navigate the challenges they face while growing up. These programs help youth develop the resilience and self-confidence they need to overcome obstacles and become agents of change. While this is important for all youth, it is critical for youth at risk, including young migrants, who have additional hurdles and stress factors.

Below are highlights of some of our successful programs in this area.

In Kenya, the Yes Youth Can! (YYC) program is owned, led, and managed by youth. It was created to engage young people impacted by the post-election violence of 2007 and 2008 in improving their own lives and the lives of people in their communities. Youth organize themselves in democratically elected bunges, or parliaments. These bunges, now active in 20,000 villages, provide a structure through which youth can engage. The program bore fruit during the 2013 elections. YYC youth organized a national campaign which resulted in 400,000 young people applying for their national ID card, which is required to vote. Youth also supported a peace caravan that culminated in messages in the national media that included peace pledges from the major presidential candidates.  The messages touched hundreds of thousands of youth immediately before the election and played a role at keeping violence to the lowest level in years.

USAID has planted the seeds of youth self-empowerment elsewhere. In Bosnia, Peacing the Future Together supports youth conflict resolution and leadership in ethnically mixed communities through “youth banks” that provide young people opportunities to develop skills while working together on youth-led initiatives, thereby boosting their confidence as agents of social change. A Ganar targets at-risk youth in fifteen countries across Latin America and the Caribbean, using soccer as a tool for teaching life and employability skills. Finally, in Jordan, Youth: Work Jordan strengthens the life, employability, and entrepreneurship skills of the most vulnerable youth in disadvantaged urban communities through training, job placement, mentorship, and civic engagement programs.

For more information on these and other USAID programs, visit our Youth Impact website. Also stay tuned for updates related to the implementation of our Youth in Development Policy. Finally, join the conversation on Twitter using #IYD2013.

Let’s Talk About HIV: The Importance of Dialogue and Information in Adolescent HIV Care

In recognition of International Youth Day, AIDSTAR-One Senior Treatment Officer discusses the importance of dialogue and information in adolescent HIV care. 

Imagine you are 15. It is your first year at a new school. You have to make new friends, meet all new teachers, struggle through your classes, and find a date for weekend parties. You want freedom and independence from your parents and caregivers. You want to be like everyone else. You worry about having cool clothes and fitting in.  You want to have a boyfriend or girlfriend. You want your friends to like you. You worry about getting in to university and what your future will be like.

Now, imagine you are 15 and you are HIV-positive. You have the same thoughts and concerns that your peers have, but you also have to worry about your health. HIV only makes being an adolescent harder. You wonder if you will still fit in if you have HIV, so you hide this information from your friends. When you start dating someone, you wonder if your boyfriend or girlfriend will still like you if you tell him or her your status. The pressure of getting good grades and planning a successful future is heightened by having to miss school for medical appointments or not feeling well.

Teen Talk, a new tool from AIDSTAR-One and BIPAI, is a resource for young adults living with HIV. Photo credit: AIDSTAR-One

Teen Talk, a new tool from AIDSTAR-One and BIPAI, is a resource for young adults living with HIV. Photo credit: AIDSTAR-One

Through advances in antiretroviral therapy (ART), children born with HIV are growing up, living, and thriving. In addition, UNAIDS reports that youth between the ages of 15-24 account for almost half of all new HIV infections. These youth are in need of comprehensive, youth-specific education to empower them to make responsible and informed decisions regarding disclosure of their HIV status, sexual behavior, and their health.

So, how do we help youth living with HIV adjust to the growing pains of adolescence, while also maintaining their health? We talk to them. Just as with any teenager, it is important for youth living with HIV to learn how to be responsible young adults, realize how their actions affect those around them, and know who they can talk to when they need help. For teenagers who are HIV-positive, it is also important to help them manage their health. They need to know how to remain healthy by eating well and remembering to take their medicine, how and when to talk to peers and teachers about their status, and why drinking or taking drugs could be particularly harmful to them.

It is hard for youth living with HIV and those who care for them to know the answers to all of these questions. AIDSTAR-One in partnership with Baylor International Pediatric AIDS Initiative (BIPAI) created Teen Talk: A Guide for Positive Living, a resource written for teens to use on their own, or for use in consultation with medical providers or caregivers. Covering issues such as adherence, nutrition, and safe sex, Teen Talk helps youth living with HIV think through their concerns and make healthy decisions. Teen Talk offers specific tools such as a calendar to help adolescents remember to take their medicine, a list of common medication side effects and possible solutions, and a question and answer guide about sex and sexual health.

With such a large population of youth living with HIV, it is increasingly important to help adolescents address their HIV status, manage their own medical care, and live a healthy life.  Living with HIV will always be a challenge. However, with tools such as Teen Talk, youth living with HIV can thrive and remain healthy in their adolescent years, bringing us one step closer to reaching the global goal of an AIDS-free generation.

AIDSTAR-One is funded by PEPFAR through USAID’s Office of HIV/AIDS. The project provides technical assistance to USAID and U.S. Government country teams to build effective, well-managed, and sustainable HIV and AIDS programs.

Learn more about youth programming at USAID. Join the conversation on Twitter using #IYD2013. 

International Youth Day: My Experience as a “Youthful” USAID Intern

In celebration of International Youth Day, an intern recounts her experience at USAID. 

When I first found out that I was going to be an intern for the federal government at USAID, I had no idea what to expect. The notions that had been swirling around in my head were a confused mix of expectations, most likely attributed to watching too many episodes of Parks and Recreation and The West Wing. Coming out of two previous internships, I expected to spend my summer in a dimly lit office cubicle filled with people in suits, much older than I am, sticking out like a sore thumb as a younger-looking Korean-American female. Knowing that I was the first undergraduate intern in the office, I felt daunted by the experience to come.

Youth Bunges (swahili word for parliament) are helping improve their community through a variety of charitable and economically empowering activities. The Bunge is a part of USAID’s Yes Youth Can, a nationwide program that empowers Kenyan youth to improve their lives and communities. Photo credit: Nichole Sobecki, USAID

Youth Bunges (swahili word for parliament) are helping improve their community through a variety of charitable and economically empowering activities. The Bunge is a part of USAID’s Yes Youth Can, a nationwide program that empowers Kenyan youth to improve their lives and communities. Photo credit: Nichole Sobecki, USAID

Working on policy in the Policy, Planning, and Learning Bureau however, was the exact opposite of what I thought I was walking into. On my first day, I was given my own desk at a nice “touchdown” space unconfined by the limitations of a cubicle. Not only was I greeted by a plethora of fluorescent lighting, but there was even a sky window by my desk- no dim lighting here. Not everyone around me wore formal attire in just black and white. I was not the only Asian-American. I certainly was not the only female, and, to my greatest surprise, I was not much younger than most of the people there.

The last of these observations was the most eye-opening. Upon initial office introductions, I gathered that at least four of my co-workers are or once were Presidential Management Fellows, meaning that they are fresh out of graduate school or in continuing education. Among these individuals were the Office Director and the Acting Deputy Director. I was actually surrounded by people just a few years older than me.

It took me just a few days to realize that I was in the company of some very intelligent and qualified individuals. The defining characteristic uniting these people however was not just their age, but their brilliance and hard work. Although they were young and still working to evolve in their career paths, all of them consistently demonstrated their competence and ability to take development issues head-on.

In addition, because they too could freshly sympathize with my experience as an intern, I was shown incredible hospitality and patience. I asked as many questions as I wanted without being shown a hint of annoyance. I asked to attend important meetings and was never denied attendance. I even asked for high-priority work and was entrusted as an equal to complete my given tasks.

What I realized over my summer internship at USAID is that the future for young professionals in government is as bright as it is because young professionals are willing to help each other. I saw first-hand that when people are able to actively engage, encourage and support each other through new endeavors and experiences, productivity soars through the roof. For the kind of impactful work that USAID conducts, this is great news.

The UN estimates that 85% of the world’s youth live in developing countries. It is becoming lucidly apparent that the need for youth voices in policy is not only fair but fundamental in creating a sustainable future for the developing world. In the same way that I personally witnessed a group of talented and compassionate young professionals willing to go out of their way to help each other, I believe that empowering youth globally in developing countries to do the same for their peers will create a better world for everyone.

Inclusive development is at the very core of democracy and can move us toward a world that, by its very nature, facilitates and critically engages the next generation.

Learn more about youth programming at USAID. Join the conversation on Twitter using #IYD2013. 

Youth, Urbanization and Health

In celebration of International Youth Day, Global Health Youth Advisor discusses U.S. Government and USAID’s health programs impacting urban youth. 

In 2010 I took a bike tour of Dar es Salaam’s slums. Over tea and chapattis my young guide told me he had lost both parents to AIDS. As the eldest, he had to ensure the education of his younger siblings. He dropped out of high school and migrated to Dar to work. Now at 24 with a good job, his siblings had finished school, and he was ready to return to school himself.

This glimpse of the vibrant yet chaotic life in Dar’s slums is one that we rarely see. I was struck by the large numbers of school-age youth in the streets working as petty traders: selling bananas, phone cards, sunglasses and pirated DVDs.

The HealthyActions program in Liberia, under the Advancing Youth Project and in partnership with EDC delivers an HIV and family planning curriculum in alternative high schools for youth that have left the formal education system. Photo credit: USAID

The HealthyActions program in Liberia, under the Advancing Youth Project and in partnership with EDC delivers an HIV and family planning curriculum in alternative high schools for youth that have left the formal education system. Photo credit: USAID

Dar is not unique. Rural to urban migration is accelerating, yet governments are ill-prepared to deal with it. In Timor L’este, I heard that that the capital’s population was growing by 10,000 people every year. Poorly serviced squatter settlements, slums, and camps are the norm in many cities, which are increasingly populated by youth seeking opportunities.

In Latin America and Asia, young female urban migrants outnumber young males. Many migrate to escape forced marriage or abusive relationships. UNICEF data from 12 countries show one in five migrant children aged 12–14 and half of those aged 15–17 move without a parent. Young urban migrants often find themselves in violent, stressful and unhealthy environments.

Migration displaces and separate youth from their homes and the protective structure and guidance of families and communities. Separation from sources of learning, recreation, and support; alteration of community routine, normalcy; and lack of positive alternatives contribute to the exploitation and abuse of young people. Young people also engage in risky behaviors, including sexual ones with dire consequences.

Developmentally appropriate reproductive health and family planning information and youth friendly services can prevent poor health outcomes, and can ensure young people receive adequate care and  support for pregnancy, unsafe abortion, STIs/HIV, and violence.

Youth face many challenges to obtaining reproductive health services. Youth migrants are doubly challenged, since slums have limited health services. Urban programs must address and involve youth. Collaboration across sectors is essential to improving the health and opportunities of urban youth migrants.

U.S. Government and USAID’s health programs impacting urban youth:

  • Young Tanzanian women who migrate to the city are susceptible to the lure of a “sugar daddy.” The Fataki radio campaign (PDF) uses humor and familiar stories to foster dialogue around the dangers of intergenerational sex, empowering community members to intervene.

  • Fourteen years of civil war in Liberia displaced much of the population. Population Services International provides HIV and FP education in alternative high schools for youth now returning to Monrovia, with increased uptake of HIV testing and contraceptives.

  • One third of the 6 billion mobile subscribers are under the age of 30. Mobile for Reproductive Health (m4RH) is an on-demand SMS system with information about contraception and nearby clinics. Young Kenyans liked the simple language and confidentiality of the service. Tanzanian and Kenyan users reported increased contraceptive knowledge and use. FHI 360 and the Rwandan Ministry of Health are adapting m4RH with additional information for young people.

Globally, young people under 18 are considered children, and younger migrants are at especially high risk. The U.S. Government’s Action Plan for Children in Adversity recommends that U.S. Government assistance support and enable families to care for their children; prevent unnecessary family-child separation; and promote appropriate, protective, and permanent family care.

Learn more about youth programming at USAID. Join the conversation on Twitter using #IYD2013. 

From the Field in Zimbabwe: Unexpectedly HIV-Free

For a pregnant woman, it takes courage to visit Epworth Clinic in Harare, Zimbabwe. Many must travel long distances to get there, but that is not the only reason. They come to the clinic to learn their HIV status or to receive antiretroviral (ARV) medication, and when they first arrive, many of the women have little hope of giving birth to a healthy child. Once they get there, however, they learn that although they have HIV, they do not need to pass it to their children.

I visited the clinic to learn how USAID is supporting the delivery of high-quality HIV/AIDS services in Zimbabwe.

Rosemary proudly holds her HIV-free baby after receiving prenatal treatment from a USAID-sponsored clinic outside Harare, Zimbabwe. Photo credit: Zoe Halpert, USAID intern

In the waiting room, I spoke with Rosemary, a 40-year-old, HIV-positive mother who was holding an 8-month-old baby. Rosemary came to the clinic for the first time several years ago when her husband’s health began to deteriorate and she suspected that they might both be HIV-positive. She was right; she tested positive for HIV and began ARV treatment several weeks later. While I was talking with Rosemary, her baby sleepily opened her eyes and chewed her blanket. She was born healthy and HIV-free.

The prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-AIDS program at Epworth clinic started in 2001. USAID provides infant HIV test kits and ARVs to many clinics throughout Zimbabwe, including Epworth. USAID’s partner, the Organisation for Public Health Interventions and Development (OPHID), provides training and supervision to the health-care workers in the clinic.  With support from USAID, this local organization is quickly increasing its ability to better address the HIV-AIDS epidemic in Zimbabwe.

Epworth clinic sees about 80 pregnant women and nursing mothers each day. When they first arrive at the clinic, they are tested for HIV and educated about family planning. As a result of the support the clinic has received from USAID, through OPHID, the number of HIV-positive babies has gone down significantly. Today, 98 percent of babies that are part of the program test negative.

When I talked with the clinic’s nurses, they told me, “If we didn’t have the USAID program, 98 percent of our patient’s babies would be HIV positive.” They also acknowledged that there would be a significant population decline.

As my visit came to a close, I asked Rosemary what advice she would give to other pregnant women. “Every woman should know her HIV status,” she said. She has found the courage to tell some of her friends her status, and strongly encourages them to get tested for their entire family’s benefit.

Visit OPHID for more information about OPHID.

Learn more about USAID’s work in Zimbabwe

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