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USAID Administrator Statement on the Passing of Ambassador Richard Holbrooke

The following is a statement from United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Administrator Dr. Rajiv Shah on the passing of Ambassador Richard Holbrooke.

“Last night, we received the sad news that Richard Holbrooke passed away. Richard’s passing will be deeply felt by his family, those he worked with and those he served.

Much has been mentioned about Richard’s tireless commitment to diplomacy, one that stretched across five decades and was marked by incredible accomplishment-supporting the Paris peace talks as a foreign service officer in Vietnam, helping to normalize our relations with China as the youngest ever Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, and designing the Dayton Accords that ended the war in Bosnia. He was one of this nation’s finest, most dedicated public servants and architects of peace.

But Richard was also deeply committed to development. He worked at USAID in the early years of his career and was a relentless champion of development in this country’s foreign policy pursuits. As Ambassador to the United Nations, Richard elevated the cause of AIDS and the concerns of Africa to the top of the international agenda. And most recently, as Special representative to Afghanistan and Pakistan, he recognized the critical role development played in countering and ending violent conflict.

Islamabad, January 13, 2010 – U.S. Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan Ambassador Richard Holbrooke exchanges signed documents with Mr. Shahid Rafi, Secretary of the Ministry of Water and Power Photo Credit: U.S. Embassy in Pakistan

The late U.S. Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan Ambassador Richard Holbrooke exchanges signed documents with Mr. Shahid Rafi, Secretary of the Ministry of Water and Power Photo Credit: U.S. Emabssy in Pakistan

I know many of you have worked closely alongside Richard and learned much from him.  As a colleague and friend, he pushed us to excel and brought his tremendous intellect and diplomatic tact to our shared mission.  I will be forever grateful for his friendship, mentoring and support and will deeply miss his larger-than-life personality.

Please join me in extending condolences to his wife Kati and the rest of his family, and let us honor Richard’s enduring contributions both to his country, and to the cause of peace around the world.”

From the Field

In Albania, we will open a Taxpayer Service Center in Tirana. Based on a new client-centered model, Albania’s General Directorate of Taxation, with the support of USAID and the MCC Threshold Program, will open a new service center in Tirana. The project has supported the remodeling of the infrastructure, including key IT infrastructure that will allow for a customer queue system and 20 customer service windows for taxpayers. Tax administration reforms are important to increase transparency and reduce corruption in Albania’s business environment.

In Paraguay, we will celebrate the results of a seven year citizen’s initiatives program to improve democracy.

In Zimbabwe, Mission Director Karen Freeman joined Ambassador Charles Ray and Zimbabwean government officials to bestow the 10th annual Auxillia Chimusoro awards to Zimbabweans who have excelled in their involvement in the fight against HIV and AIDS in Zimbabwe. The awards are given to individuals and organizations that have made substantial contributions in communication, leadership, social investment and other areas to mitigate the effects and impact of HIV/AIDS. The awards are named after Auxillia Chimusoro, one of the first individuals to disclose their HIV positive status in Zimbabwe. This year, the awardees included Catherine Murombedzi, the first journalist in Zimbabwe to disclose her HIV positive status, Head of the HIV and Tuberculosis (TB) unit in the Ministry of Health and Child Welfare Dr. Owen Mugurundgi, and the late Dr. Monica Glenshaw, a former District Medical Officer for Manicaland.

In Iraq, we will join The Ministry of Health (MoH)for their  Annual National Conference.  This year the conference will focus on “Training Management in Health Institutions”. The MoH Human Resource and Development Center (HRTDC), International Medical Corps (IMC) and USAID/Tatweer are partners in this conference. Papers from each Directorate of Health from each province will be presented.  Several workshops will also take place, topics include: planning and implementing the training process and developing training curricula, the role of IT in improving health information systems, the impact of training on MoH service delivery, accreditation and quality assurance of training and budget preparation for training.  Additionally, as USAID/Tatweer comes to a close, the conference will highlight MoH and USAID/Tatweer successes in developing sustainable capacity and affecting system reform in the Ministry.

In Honor of International Human Rights Day

Today, in honor of International Human Rights Day and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, U.S. Embassies and USAID missions around the world are opening their doors to civil society; to the Russian journalists who bravely report on corruption and abuse in the face of grave danger; to the Egyptian human rights activists who fight every day for justice; to the Kenyan political activists who recently helped shepherd a peaceful vote on a Constitutional referendum.

In 1994, USAID became the world’s first donor agency to establish democracy, human rights, and governance as core development objectives.  Since then, USAID has become the leading development agency on these issues.  With over 400 experts worldwide, USAID manages and programs the vast majority of the U.S. Government’s total budget—over three billion dollars this year alone—devoted to these issues.

These investments are critical to our national security and to reflect our national character, making the word safer and more equitable. That’s why the Obama Administration has laid out an ambitious democracy, human rights, and governance agenda for USAID.  We are engaged in a renewed focus to help our partners deliver for their citizens.

In Colombia, USAID created an early warning system to help prevent human rights violations by illegal armed actors, paramilitaries, leftist guerrillas, and drug mafias.

In Indonesia, USAID worked across 9 provinces with nearly 600 local nongovernmental organizations to increase citizen participation in local governance and social service provision.

Across Asia, USAID helped uphold rights to access for at-risk populations, including transgender communities and men who have sex with men, to HIV/AIDS prevention, care, and treatment, as well as building regional and in-country capacities to respond.

In Egypt, USAID is supporting disability advocates to organize and lead the development of policies and programs targeting the inclusion of people with disabilities, impacting over 15,000 Egyptians with disabilities at both the local and national levels.

And in the Democratic Republic of Congo, USAID and its partners helped provide medical services, fight impunity, and promote community awareness of and response to sexual and gender-based violence for more than 100,000 survivors of rape.

At USAID, we cherish the fundamental liberties contained in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and we promote democratic institutions to fulfill these rights for every global citizen.

Every day, we are dedicated to making USAID the leader on advancing democracy, human rights, and governance globally.  Today on this day, with our friends, with our allies, and especially with human rights activists around the world, we support and honor the global efforts to expand human rights for all.

Seeing the Victory Through: The 50th Anniversary of the Marshall Plan

Watch this historic video from 1997  on the Marshall Plan that was established in 1949 by Secretary of State George C. Marshall based on the urgent need to help the European Recovery after World War II. This video portrays U.S. aid over the years.

Saving Seca – Protecting Victims of Trafficking

Human trafficking is an abuse of human rights and a form of modern slavery that transcends societal borders without regard to race, gender or age. It affects men, women and children all over the world but most especially in developing countries.

Individuals and families are entrapped in through forced labor and complicated schemes of debt bondage that often continue from one generation to the next. Countless victims are forced to become child soldiers or sexual slaves, coerced into prostitution and humiliating, often brutal situations that result in physical and psychological trauma.

The global community has condemned human trafficking and is committed to finding ways to stop traffickers and better assist victims. Today, USAID Chief Counselor, Bambi Arellano spoke at the Washington D.C. premiere of the anti-trafficking film, Saving Seca, at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.  The screening was a joint collaboration between USAID and The Asia Foundation for  the “16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence,” campaign which runs each year from the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women through International Human Rights Day.

The film is intended as a police training tool that demonstrates best practices for ensuring the protection of trafficking victims during brothel raids and rescues. It is a dramatization presented in Cambodian with English subtitles; it follows Seca, a young trafficking victim who has been sold to a brothel and the Cambodian’s police efforts to free her and other victims. The film has been endorsed by the Royal Government of Cambodia and is now included in the official training for police in that country.

Gender violence is a global epidemic – a human rights abuse that encompasses a broad range of issues including human trafficking. USAID is committed to working with our partners and the NGO community to continue to combat gender based violence and human trafficking around the world.

USAID’s Frontlines – November 2010

Read the latest edition of USAID’s premier publication, FrontLines for these stories:

participants in a cash-for-work program in Uganda who were building a road to link their community with the nearest market.

Photo caption: This photo, a runner-up in FrontLines’ November 2010 photo contest, shows participants in a cash-for-work program in Uganda who were building a road to link their community with the nearest market. The effort, part of the 2009 Horn Food Price Crisis Response, was implemented by Mercy Corps, the International Rescue Committee and Medair. See the winning image from the photo contest and 10 other photographs taken by FrontLines readers on the FrontLines web page. And get your cameras ready: the deadline for the next FrontLines photo contest is Jan. 10. Get more details at here. Photo credit: Kaarli Sundsmo, USAID

  • The United States and India will partner on the Evergreen Revolution, vowing to work together to echo the successes of the 1960s Green Revolution and improve food security and prosperity around the world

Read these stories and more in the new issue of FrontLines. If you would like to automatically receive FrontLines every month, you can subscribe here.

USAID Commemorates International Day of Persons with Disabilities

To commemorate this year’s International Day of Persons with Disabilities, USAID is hosting a photo display, “USAID and Inclusive Development” in the lobby at the 14th Street entrance of the Ronald Reagan Building on December 3. Nancy Lindborg, Assistant Administrator for the Bureau of Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance, will speak at the display opening at 4:00 P.M. The display consists of images from USAID’s programs worldwide and illustrates the progress USAID and our partners have made in integrating persons with disabilities into the political, social, economic, and cultural life in communities around the world. It demonstrates how USAID’s inclusive development programming aligns with the Millennium Development Goals.

A usual day in inclusive kindergarten, supported by the USAID-funded Children in Difficult Circumstances Project, implemented by World Vision. Photo courtesy USAID/Yerevan

The International Day of Persons with Disabilities, annually observed on December 3, aims to promote a better understanding of disability issues worldwide. Established by the U.N. in 1981, it focuses on the rights of persons with disabilities and the value of integrating persons with disabilities into every aspect of society.

This year’s theme for International Day of Persons with Disabilities is “Keeping the Promise: Mainstreaming Disability in the Millennium Development Goals Towards 2015 and Beyond.” It continues the connection between disability programming in the developing world and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). It reminds us that although many commitments have been made by the international development community to include persons with disabilities in all aspects of development, much work remains to fulfill those commitments.

Last year’s theme, “Making the Millennium Development Goals Disability-Inclusive: Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities and Their Communities Around the World,” linked disability to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). USAID supports the MDGs and inclusive development in its own policies and programming in its missions around the world.

In 2008, the International Day of Persons with Disabilities acknowledged the development of the U.N. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The Convention provides a legally binding instrument to ensure that societies recognize that all people must be provided with the opportunities to live life to their fullest potential. The United States signed the U.N. Convention on July 30, 2009.

In September 1997, USAID adopted a groundbreaking policy which led to the creation of a detailed framework to guide USAID’s efforts in the area of disability and inclusive development. The policy states that USAID will not discriminate against persons with disabilities and will work to ensure the inclusion of these individuals in USAID-funded programs and activities. The policy also calls on USAID missions to enlist partners, host-country counterparts, and other donors in a collaborative effort to end discrimination against and promote equal opportunity for persons with disabilities.

In 2005, Congress provided USAID with a dedicated source of funding to complement their commitment to include persons with disabilities in development programs and to empower them to advocate for their own rights. To date, these initiatives have supported programs in more than 40 countries, primarily through financial and technical assistance to USAID missions to promote their own inclusive  development  activities.

USAID works to educate employees on disability issues through courses and workshops. USAID provides tools and technical assistance to field missions as they institutionalize the policy and it has developed self-reporting mechanisms to track progress in implementing the policy in Washington, D.C. and overseas.

Learn more about USAID’s Disability Policy and Inclusive Development programming.

Contact: Rob Horvath, rhorvath@usaid.gov

50 Weeks to 50 Years at USAID – Week 1: Presidential Development Visionaries

“No objective supporter of foreign aid can be satisfied with the existing program-actually a multiplicity of programs. Bureaucratically fragmented, awkward and slow, its administration is diffused over a haphazard and irrational structure covering at least four departments and several other agencies. The program is based on a series of legislative measures and administrative procedures conceived at different times and for different purposes, many of them now obsolete, inconsistent and unduly rigid and thus unsuited for our present needs and purposes. Its weaknesses have begun to undermine confidence in our effort both here and abroad.”

On March 22, 1961, President John F. Kennedy wrote these words in a letter to Congress; a letter calling for significant changes to how the United States approached global development. That letter led to the creation of our nation’s first global development strategy. Eight months later, USAID was born.

Fast forward nearly five decades to another crossroad. Another U.S. president is examining how we might better assist the world’s poorest countries and those most in need.

President Obama addresses the U.N. General Assembly. Photo credit: US Mission to the United Nations

In September of this year, President Barack Obama unveiled his Global Development Policy, which for the first time elevates international development as a core pillar of U.S. foreign policy. In front of the United Nations, he called for a renewed, modern and rebuilt USAID to carry out that vision.

This week marks a 50-week count-down to USAID’s 50th anniversary.

President Kennedy’s and President Obama’s respective visions are not bookends in the story of U.S. global development. Instead, they serve as two points of reflection for this country’s premier development agency – its conception and its renaissance. Where we started, and, more importantly, where we would like to go to meet tomorrow’s challenges.

Each week, for the next 50 weeks, we will fill the area between the points with an artifact, document, or story in the build up to our 50th anniversary on November 3, 2011.

But this does not mean we are looking backward. The 50th anniversary is a time to celebrate and reflect, but also an opportunity to look forward. The final bookend to Kennedy’s letter to Congress will be set in place when we have put ourselves out of business, creating the conditions where our work is no longer needed.

USAID in the News

The Minneapolis Star Tribune published an article on Dean Atwood, who was a top USAID administrator during President Clinton’s administration, and his new position as chairman of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s Development Assistance Committee.

The Washington Post’s Career Coach wrote about how many different backgrounds and skills can be utilized through employment at USAID.

 

USAID’s Frontlines – October 2010


Read the latest edition of USAID’s premier publication, FrontLines for these stories:

President Barack Obama calls international developmenta moral imperative and a key element in U.S. national security policy during a landmark United Nations speech

Tech innovators and grown-up science fair fans test drive innovative devices on the fast track to production and deployment in poor countries struggling with development challenges

After 60 years in Indonesia, USAID looks back at its successes and ahead to what is shaping up as a precedent-setting relationship between country and mission

Talk of microfinance and opening small businesses replaces talk of entrenched fighting in Iraq’s once notorious Falluja

A product that measures the size of a mothball is having an outsized impact on Bangladeshi rice farms – and the incomes of the rice farmers

Read these stories and more in the new issue of FrontLines. If you would like to automatically receive FrontLines every month, you can subscribe here.

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