USAID Impact Photo Credit: USAID and Partners

Archives for USAID

USAID in the News: 5/2/2011–5/6/2011

May 2- FutureGov reported that USAID is teaming up with NASA to expand international development efforts by applying geospatial technologies to overcome challenges in food security, climate change, and energy and environmental management in many developing countries. The technology will involve satellite data and mapping tools.

May 4-The Hill, the Council on Foreign Relations, and Federal Computer Week announced Secretary Clinton’s unveiling of a new public-private partnership called the Mobile Alliance for Maternal Action (MAMA), which aims to provide women with health information using mobile phone technology. The National Journal quotes Administrator Shah as saying that, “This partnership will harness the power of mobile technology to provide mothers with information about pregnancy, childbirth, and the first year of life.”

May 4- FederalNewsRadio reported that USAID is boosting its partnership with NASA by signing a new memo of understanding to share technologies in addressing international development problems.

May 5- The New York Times “Green” blog reported on an interview with Administrator Shah concerning family planning. The Agency is collaborating with several U.S. and international partners to prevent millions of unwanted pregnancies and to help children to survive into adulthood so that parents do not feel pressured to have more children.

USAID in the News

Weekly Briefing (4/25/2011–4/29/2011)

April 25 NextGov reported that NASA and USAID have signed a pact to share more satellite data and mapping tools with international partners for disaster response. The five-year memorandum of understanding covers several initiatives funded through both agencies that focus on global health, hunger, disaster relief and environmental dangers.

April 27 AFP, CNN, and Voice of America reported that a major food aid report released by USAID aims to improve the quality of food it distributes abroad. The report Delivering Improved Nutrition calls for revisions in dietary elements to fight hunger and to focus on providing proper nutrition to children under two and pregnant women.

In The News: 4/11/2011–4/15/2011

April 12: An article in the Washington Business Journal wrote that USAID will increasingly give contracts to companies in the countries where the projects are performed. Administrator Shah said that, “Instead of continuing to sign large contracts with large contractors, we are accelerating our funding to local partners who have the cultural knowledge and in-country expertise to deliver lasting, durable growth.”

April 13: Voice of America reports that USAID has launched “Saving Lives At Birth: A Grand Challenge for Development” in partnership between the Agency, the Norwegian government, the Gates Foundation, Global Challenges Canada, and the World Bank. The Grand Challenge focuses on reducing the number of deaths among mothers and infants in developing countries as part of the drive to improve global health.

USAID in the News: 4/4/2011–4/8/2011

April 4: Bloomberg News reported that USAID will send a team into Libya to provide humanitarian relief in the face of the current conflict. Mark Ward, USAID Deputy Assistant Administrator for the Bureau for Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance, said that one of the team’s first tasks will be to “contact those opposed to Qaddafi, including the National Transitional Council, to coordinate the delivery of relief.”

April 7: Voice of America reported that USAID is taking the lead on American humanitarian efforts in Libya. The pledged $47 million dollars are being used to “first, [deliver] desperately needed humanitarian aid; second, [pressure] and [isolate] the Muammar Gadhafi regime through sanctions and other measures; and third [support] efforts by Libyans to achieve their aspirations through political changes.”

April 8: MIT News reported that at a speech delivered on campus by USAID Administrator Shah, the future of development will be shaped by new ideas and innovation. And that programs developed through MIT’s D-Lab are helping to “transform the world of development.”

2011 Annual Letter

Fifty years ago, John F. Kennedy wrote a letter to congress that called for the creation of the agency I am now privileged to lead – USAID, the United States Agency for International Development.

Having witnessed the devastation the Second World War caused in Europe – and the success the Marshall Plan had in rebuilding it – President Kennedy argued that advancing opportunity and freedom to all people was central to America’s domestic security, comparative prosperity and national conscience.

I wanted to commemorate President Kennedy’s letter by writing one of my own, describing our agency’s work to the millions of Americans who care deeply about overcoming global poverty, hunger, illness and injustice.

I also wanted Americans to know that by doing good, we do well. Our assistance depends on generosity from the American people. But it also derives benefits for the American people: it keeps our country safe and strengthens our economy. As Secretary Clinton has said, development is “as central to advancing American interests and solving global problems as diplomacy and defense.”

And because development assistance is so crucial, I wanted to stress our need to deliver it more effectively than ever before, getting results faster, more sustainably, and at a lower cost so more people can benefit. I hope this letter makes those points clear, sheds light on our agency’s future trajectory and establishes a lasting tradition that builds on President Obama’s strong commitment to transparency.

NOAA-USAID Join Forces for Global Development

As featured in the White House Office of Science & Technology Policy Blog by Hillary Chen

Hillary Chen is a Policy Analyst in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy

Earlier this week I had the pleasure of joining with scientists and development experts at a workshop jointly sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).  The workshop focused on ways to re-energize scientific collaboration between the two agencies and help developing countries deal with challenges in climate change, biodiversity and human health, and geospatial analysis capacity.  It brought together NOAA’s and USAID’s scientific and technical experts in a range of fields including science-based ecosystem management, weather monitoring and forecasting, climate services and analysis, satellite-based and information services, and spatial analysis and geospatial technologies.

The workshop fits within the Administration’s larger efforts to make better use of science, technology, and innovation for global development under President Obama’s Policy Directive on Global Development.  OSTP Director John Holdren and USAID Administrator Raj Shah have noted that as a global leader in science, technology, and innovation with $148 billion invested in domestic research and development (R&D), the United States can have a significant impact in developing countries by applying its technical expertise to global challenges.

Past successful collaborations between NOAA and USAID include the Indian Ocean Tsunami Early Warning System that was established after the devastating tsunami of 2004.  Current joint efforts between the two agencies include the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET), which uses satellite and ground-based data to provide timely food security information for 25 countries in Africa and other parts of the developing world and the U.S. Coral Triangle Initiative Support Program, which aims to improve the management of millions of hectares of coastal and marine ecosystems to protect food security and strengthen resilience to climate change for the 363 million people who live in this area.  At a time when we are all reminded that natural disasters anywhere in the world can have widespread and even global implications, it was inspiring to see NOAA and USAID building their shared capacity to understand and respond to challenges beyond our borders.

This latest collaboration between USAID and NOAA is a great example of how U.S. R&D can be leveraged efficiently to accelerate growth and make societies around the world—including our own—more resilient to environmental changes around the globe.

Celebrating National Women’s History Month: Mother and Daughter Team Up for Development

USAID 50th anniversary banner

The phrase “like mother, like daughter” can refer to common physical traits or hobbies, but in the case of Paula and Caroline Bertolin, it is their shared passion for development work that best applies.

March is National Women’s History Month, a time to reflect on the countless women who are making a difference in the world.  For Paula, it is through her work at USAID.  She believes in the Agency’s mission of humanitarian assistance. “USAID does what needs to be done for countries that need it,” she explains.   Paula is an officer in the Office of Food for Peace, working on issues of food security for Ethiopia for the U.S. Government’s longest-running and largest food assistance program.  These initiatives respond to short-term relief and long-term development.  Before working at USAID, she served over five years in the Peace Corps in Cameroon, and has worked for Catholic Relief Services in Burkina Faso and in Kenya.

Caroline, 30 years old, followed her mother down the development career track.  She recently became a member of the Foreign Service where she is a Contracts and Agreements Officer, overseeing the execution of contracts and assistance awards.  She works on the business side of USAID, in partnership with recipient governments and organizations to make USAID assistance as effective and efficient as possible.

“My parents were very proud and excited,” she says of their reaction when she decided to work for USAID. In the career choice, she has also emulated her father, a 30-year Foreign Service veteran. For Caroline, it’s not just a career, but a lifestyle.  She believes kids who spend a part of their childhood surrounded by different cultures, languages and people develop excellent skills of observation and adaption.  She acknowledges that when growing up, her best answer to the “where’s home” question was:  “wherever my family happens to be at the moment!”

Although Paula has spent most of her career working in the Africa region, Caroline is ready for assignments in any region of the globe.  She explains: “Part of the beauty of being a Contracting Officer is that you are a true generalist.  You get to work with a variety of programs from any and all technical sectors at USAID and you are always wanted—and  needed – everywhere!”

Reflecting on National Women’s History Month, Paula believes that women in the work force still have “a long way to go, particularly if you choose to take time out for childrearing.” She cites that women, especially with interrupted careers, are victims of the pay gap, which was recently cited in a White House report.

The younger Bertolin gives her mother’s generation credit for breaking into USAID’s male-dominated Foreign Service Corps. However, she states, “the women of my generation need to produce more representation at the top levels of USAID — we need more women in high-level leadership roles.  This will affect how girls at home and abroad think about women and their role in development.”

Like mother, like daughter.

USAID in the News

Weekly Briefing (3/21/2011–3/25/2011)

March 22 The Sherman Oaks (CA) Patch reported that alongside a Fairfax, Virginia team, USAID dispatched 74 LA County firefighters to Japan two days after they returned from an earthquake rescue mission in New Zealand. In addition, six search and rescue dogs trained by the National Disaster Search Dog Foundation helped firefighters look for survivors in the debris. On its website, CNN also posted a video highlighting the work of the Search & Rescue teams.

March 23 The Financial Times published an op-ed by Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack calling for “an international effort to avoid a repeat of the 2007-2008 spikes in food prices.” He advocates for more transparency on food production and limiting restrictions on exports, and says that a 70% increase in food production will be necessary in the future. The USAID-led Feed the Future initiative is heading this productivity effort.

March 24 On World Tuberculosis Day, Voice of America published an editorial highlighting USAID’s work to prevent and control TB in countries around the world. “USAID will strive to treat 2.6 million TB patients and initiate treatment of at least 57,200 new cases by 2014,” said USAID Administrator Dr. Rajiv Shah.

USAID Official Featured as Voice of America’s “American Profile of the Week”

Ellyn Ogden, USAID’s worldwide polio eradication coordinator, immunizes a child during a festive kick-off event for a polio vaccination campaign in Kabul, Afghanistan.

USAID’s Worldwide Polio Eradication Coordinator, Ellyn Ogden, has devoted her career to eradicating polio and advocating for children’s health.

Read more about her life and work in this week’s VOA profile.

Making the Unavoidable Unacceptable

On World Water Day, March 22, safe drinking water and sanitation experts gather across the globe both to celebrate successes and to develop more effective, sustainable ways of meeting this vital development need. One element of those conversations is that the lack of safe drinking water and sanitation in developing countries poses a number of multidisciplinary challenges:

  • This is primarily a global public health challenge, but requires primarily public works solutions.
  • Water and sanitation are important in their own right, but both are also vital to sustainable progress for other important development challenges including health, nutrition, education (especially for girls), poverty alleviation, and human security.
  • Solutions require innovation, but most importantly they require appropriately and sustainably scaling the answers known since Roman times, or at least since the introduction of chlorine into New Jersey’s municipal water supply in 1903.

As challenging as it is, however, we can undeniably achieve universal access to water and sanitation with today’s technology, funding, and political leadership.

That last statement resonates most loudly for the 884 million people who lack safe drinking water today, and for the 2.6 billion people who lack improved sanitation facilities. The approximately two million deaths due annually to unsafe water and sanitation, and the waterborne diseases causing those deaths, can for the most part be prevented. And preventing them is not simply smart development policy for the United States; it is a life and death situation for millions of people, and a significant leadership opportunity for this Administration and country.

On World Water Day let us recognize that this challenge is not simply solvable. It is being solved by communities all over the world, and the government of the United States and its philanthropies, corporations, and citizens are helping in often very effective and sustainable ways. Health specialists, engineers, and economic development experts work together to not just drill more wells and build more latrines, but to strengthen capacity of indigenous groups and communities in developing countries to provide these services themselves.

So as USAID and its partners in the United States and abroad continue to implement fully the Senator Paul Simon Water for the Poor Act of 2005 [PDF], some suggestions follow on how to accelerate that progress and make sure the work sustains itself over the long run:

2011 is the year of quality, effectiveness, and sustainability in the water and sanitation sector. Implementing agencies of the U.S. Government and outside entities (nonprofits, philanthropists, civic groups like Rotary International, corporate philanthropies, and private citizens) should always ask themselves the tough questions during the early stages of each program:

  • Is the activity they are implementing or supporting likely to endure technically? Are local businesspersons trained and incentivized to manage a supply chain?
  • Is the financial model in place to ensure that the funds will be available locally to repair, upgrade, or expand the system?
  • Is the ribbon-cutting ceremony not just the self-congratulatory end of the program, but simply the next step toward a sustainable water and sanitation intervention that endures 15-20 years?
  • Is there an ongoing monitoring and evaluation program whose successes and failures are frequently updated and knowable to all stakeholders?

In today’s tight fiscal times we need the answer to these questions to be “Yes” more frequently than in the past. This will get the biggest possible bang for our dollar, be it a development assistance or a philanthropic dollar.

So on World Water Day let us take a closer look at sustainably tackling the lack of safe drinking water and sanitation. This is an unassailably grave yet solvable development challenge, and a multi-track diplomacy opportunity with almost unlimited upside. The United States government and citizens have an opportunity to prevent more waterborne illness and mortality and should redouble efforts to do so in a sustainable, scalable fashion. Let us work together to turn water-related death and disease from an unavoidable fact of life to completely unacceptable.

World Water Day events in the Washington DC area: www.waterday.org
The United Nations World Water Day website: www.worldwaterday.org
UNICEF / WHO Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation: www.wssinfo.org

John Oldfield is Managing Director of the WASH Advocacy Initiative, a nonprofit advocacy effort in Washington DC entirely dedicated to helping solve the global safe drinking water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) challenge. Its mission is to increase awareness of the global WASH challenge and solutions, and to increase the amount and effectiveness of resources devoted to solving the problem around the developing world.

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