USAID Impact Photo Credit: USAID and Partners

Archives for Sub-Saharan Africa

Water Education for African Youth

John Etgen, Senior Vice President of the Project WET Foundation, wrote a great piece this week for Johns Hopkins University’s Global Water Magazine on the booming youth population and the benefits of educating students about water. Here’s a bit of what he had to say…

In the 16 African countries where the Project WET Foundation has trained teachers and localized water science education materials in cooperation with educators and education ministries, teaching about water has led to real change that has improved lives—not only for schoolchildren but also for the community at large.

At the Lake Victoria Primary School in Entebbe, Uganda; for example, students who had been taught about water quality as well as sanitation and hygiene formed an after-school environment club to tackle some of the issues the lessons raised for them.

Their first action was to resurrect an old rain barrel that had fallen into disuse and connect it with new gutters on the school to collect rain water for use in hand washing and other school water needs.

For the full story, be sure to visit the Global Water Program.

Improving Access to Education for Girls in Sudan

Submitted by Angela Stephens, USAID/LPA

Following more than two decades of civil war, Southern Sudan has one of the lowest literacy rates in the world.  The areas in Sudan’s north-south border zone also suffered greatly during the war, including Blue Nile state, bordering Ethiopia.  Girls have been disproportionately affected, with lower rates of literacy and school attendance than boys.  To help alleviate these challenges, USAID this year opened the Granville-Abbas Girls’ Secondary School in the Blue Nile town of Kurmuk.  The school is named in honor of John Granville, an American diplomat who worked on democracy programs for USAID in Sudan, and his Sudanese colleague Abdelrahman Abbas Rahama. They were assassinated in Khartoum on January 1, 2008.  The school, which can accommodate 120 female students, has three sets of classrooms, a library, theater, cafeteria, dormitories, and teachers’ offices.  A USAID-supported learning center attached to the school provides students with Internet access and computer training.  Watch this two-part video of the school dedication ceremony and tribute to Granville and Rahama.

To see PART TWO, click here.

Partnership Plans Announced at Southern Sudan Agriculture Conference

Submitted by Angela Stephens

Despite enormous potential for Southern Sudan’s agriculture sector, decades of conflict and the legacies of war—including poor transport, limited storage capacity and processing facilities, and a poor investment climate—have hindered agriculture development.  As a result, most southern Sudanese farmers produce for subsistence rather than profit, and consumers suffer from high prices of food products, many of which are imported from neighboring countries.

USAID and the U.S. Special Envoy to Sudan hosted a conference in Nairobi August 24-25 with the Government of Southern Sudan to address these challenges and revitalize agriculture in southern Sudan, with the goal of improving food security and economic growth for the people of the region.

At the conference, USAID and the Government of Southern Sudan launched an Agriculture Innovation Fund designed to finance public-private sector partnerships promoting new approaches to agricultural development in southern Sudan.  USAID also described its plans to establish a United States-Southern Sudan Agriculture Advisory Council composed of agriculture experts from the two governments, and from universities in the United States and southern Sudan, to provide expert advice to the governments on the design and assessment of agriculture development programs in the region.  In addition, USAID is working to establish partnerships on agriculture education between Juba University, Catholic University of Sudan, John Garang University, and leading U.S. educational institutions.

Howard G. Buffett, President of the Howard G. Buffett Foundation, participated in a panel on private sector partnerships and pledged support for a seeds program with the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa.

 

USAID Strengthens Malaria Control Efforts in Africa

Submitted by Elissa Jensen

Thanks to a little teamwork, efforts toward sustainable malaria control in Africa just received a boost.  Indoor residual spraying (IRS), a mainstay of malaria eradication efforts for decades, has typically involved oversight by health specialists trained in IRS application.  But the intervention also requires input from environmental experts, who have historically been overlooked in IRS operations.

This summer, with USAID support under the President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI), environmental experts from across Africa participated in a workshop in Kisumu, Kenya, to review and refine best practices to support health teams in providing oversight and management of IRS.  The workshop was the first of its kind to introduce such an integrated approach.

In addition to discussing the development of environmental assessments and proper waste disposal, participants addressed the challenges associated with proper implementation of IRS considering real-life constraints, such as scarcity of water and lack of infrastructure.

With their training, participants will increasingly work alongside counterparts from the health sector to provide oversight of environmental components of IRS operations, thereby strengthening local and regional capacity for sustainable malaria control.  Soon after the workshop, in fact, two of the participants conducted environmental inspections and provided technical assistance in new spray areas in Zambia and Ethiopia.

USAID is proud to contribute to PMI, which has provided IRS to nearly 7 million houses and protected 27 million people through spray campaigns since 2006.

NBA and WNBA Bring Nets to Senegal but Grab Mosquitoes, not Baskets

Submitted by: Susan Telingator

On Friday, August 6, USAID/Senegal was pleased to be a part of the effort to distribute long-lasting, insecticide-treated mosquito nets with the United Nations Foundation’s Nothing But Nets Campaign and NBA Cares programs in Rufisque, a suburb of Dakar. Teams of NBA (National Basketball Association) and WNBA (Women’s National Basketball Association) players, USAID staff, US Peace Corps volunteers, government health workers and media crews ventured out into the town after a short ceremony emphasizing the importance of sleeping under a mosquito net in order to prevent malaria.

The visit was especially significant for those players who were born on the African continent. NBA Vice President for Development, Amadou Gallo Fall (originally from Senegal), talked to residents in their native Wolof language, followed by NBA legend Dikembe Mutombo (originally from Congo), who spoke in French.

USAID’s President’s Malaria Initiative, which has a nationwide bed net distribution program here, provided technical assistance and coordinated logistics among the various groups. The organizations spent the rest of the weekend running their “Basketball without Borders” program, a four-day camp, which received 65 of the top 19-and-under basketball players from across Africa. This was the first time these events were held in Senegal.

Microfinance is Boosting Entrepreneurs in Southern Sudan

Submitted by Angela Stephens

Last month, USAID sponsored the First Southern Sudan Microfinance Conference, giving experts and practitioners an opportunity to exchange views about how to build the sector, which is still in its infancy in Southern Sudan. In 2003, when USAID helped establish the in Southern Sudan, a region the size of France.

Since then, SUMI has disbursed more than $2.7 million in loans to 10,000 clients—half of them women—empowering entrepreneurs to launch and expand businesses such as tea houses, bakeries, restaurants, and retail shops. It has also expanded its operations to six branches in four states—Central Equatoria, Western Equatoria, Lakes, and Western Bahr el Ghazal. Two international microfinance institutions—Finance Sudan and BRAC—are also now operating in southern Sudan.

There are now an estimated 45,000 active micro-loan borrowers in southern Sudan, borrowing between approximately 200 Sudanese pounds (about $80) to more than 400 Sudanese pounds (about $160). Microlending is increasing trade and improving household incomes.

Laikipia and Beyond Unity Cup

Submitted by Nicole Enerson

Cameroonian soccer star, Samuel Eto’o, encourages young athletes at a “green soccer tournament” in Rift Valley Province, Kenya

The Laikipia Wildlife Forum, a USAID partner for the past 10 years, hosted a 6 week “green tournament” in Laikipia District. The aim of the Laikipia Beyond Unity Cup (LUC) was “to harness the power of sports and the enthusiasm for the World Cup to score goals for unity, peace and environmental awareness in the often troubled district of Laikipia”.

Throughout the tournament, thousands of people were drawn together from all over the district and representing every ethnic group and most major institutions in Laikipia – including commercial farms, wildlife conservancies, the provincial administration, government Ministries, the British Army and the Kenyan Air Force. The tournament, organized by the Zeitz Foundation in cooperation with UNEP, and sponsored by Safaricom, was the first of its kind bringing together a total of 32 teams.

As well as football, the LUC weekend gatherings also held a wide range of environmental activities such as local clean-ups, tree planting, and environmental discussions. In addition, free medical treatment was provided to tournament spectators and participants. Doctors, dentists, and VCT (voluntary counseling and testing for HIV) counselors treated over 12,000 people.

Cameroonian footballer and UNEP Goodwill Ambassador, Samuel Eto’o, was the patron of the tournament. Eto’o, along with tournament participants took the LUC green pledge: “The Earth is our home and together we must conserve our precious water, land, forests and wildlife. I am proud to pledge that I will unite with others throughout Laikipia and that I will give a red card to environmental destruction and defend our natural heritage”. Before leaving, Eto’o dedicated his first goal of the new season to Laikipia District.

This Week at USAID – August 2, 2010

Administrator Shah will join President Obama at the White House for a town hall during the Presidential Young African Leaders Forum.  As a global leader in empowering and engaging youth, USAID works to ensure that young people have access to skills and opportunities to be active and effective citizens who contribute to their country’s overall stability and development.

Ambassador Garvelink, Deputy Coordinator of Feed the Future, will speak at two sessions during the International Food Aid and Development Conference in Kansas City.  His keynote address will underscore the U.S. commitment to addressing global hunger and food security, highlighting the whole-of-government approach and goals of Feed the Future.

Advancing Maternal and Child Health in the World We Live In

When the theme of the 15th African Union Summit in Kampala, Uganda was announced, there was tremendous excitement among the public health community. “Maternal, Infant, and Child Health and Development in Africa” would be a real opportunity to bring to the fore some of the most critical issues in health and development. While specific diseases have gained the attention of world leaders and the global community in recent years, the essential challenge of improving the health status of women and children has often been neglected. This Summit would finally be an opportunity to engage in high-level discussion about how to improve the status of women and children on the African continent. As a Health Officer at the USAID/Uganda Mission, I was looking forward to participating in the conference in support of our U.S. Delegation, anticipating new opportunities to advance the agenda for moms and kids.

And then, two weeks before the opening of the Summit, everything changed. Terrorist bombings tore through Kampala on what should have been a joyful Sunday evening marking the close of the World Cup. Families and friends participating in the global celebration had their lives ended or forever altered by acts of horrendous murder.

Adjusting to our new reality of a terrorist threat in what is usually a safe and relaxed city was quickly overtaken by additional security concerns related to the AU Summit. Ugandans have had to simultaneously mourn while also preparing to welcome the continent’s leaders to their hometown. Grieving for many was cut short.

As I sat in the opening ceremony of the Summit on Sunday, hearing numerous Heads of State and our own Attorney General condemn the unspeakable acts of murder in Kampala, it became clear that the focus of the Summit would be Somalia. As I supported the U.S. delegation’s efforts through the Summit, Somalia and terrorism on the African continent was indeed the central theme of most meetings.

As a public health practitioner, there is of course disappointment that maternal and child health did not gain as much central attention at the Summit as had been hoped for. But the Summit made it clearer to me than ever to me why taking a development approach to advancing health in Africa is so essential. Taking a development approach means working in the real world with the real world problems that conflict, poverty, and even terrorism bring. We need to pay as much credence to applying health interventions to real-world settings as we do to the scientific research that helps us understand what might work in the first place. Conflict, poverty, and terrorism are a real part of women and children’s lives in Africa. While scientific research and innovations remain fundamentally important, we do not have the luxury of applying health interventions in a controlled setting. To advance health status in a sustainable way, we need to be vigilant of the harsh realities that women and children in Africa are facing. For although maternal and child health deserves a great deal of attention in its own right, we cannot separate health interventions that need scale-up from the realities that moms and kids are living in.

So, on the closing day of the AU Summit, I applaud the public health practitioners and advocates who soldiered on during the Summit to maintain some focus on maternal and child health, as it is an issue that deserves the highest levels of attention. But I also challenge us as a public health community to remember that terrorism and conflict are not simply distractions to our goals. This is, unfortunately, the world we are working and living in. These issues shape the lives of the women and children we are working to save. We need to work with local institutions to understand local issues, and transform evidence-based interventions into reality-based interventions. It is only by addressing the reality of conflict, poverty, and now even terrorism that our goals for improving health can be realized. With a development approach to improving health, women and children all over the continent, including Somalia, stand a better chance.

USAID – From the Field

In Zambia USAID has partnered with World Vision to implement The Community Based Prevention Initiative for Orphans and Vulnerable Children, Youth and other Vulnerable Populations Program to strengthen community response and leadership for HIV prevention and improve the quality of life for orphans and other vulnerable, at-risk children.  USAID and World Vision will work with the Zambian government to strengthen community response and leadership for HIV prevention; improve the quality of life for orphans and other at-risk children through educational, psychosocial, food and nutritional support and by improving their access to health care, child protection and legal services.

The American people’s response to HIV/AIDS in Zambia has contributed significantly to the scale up of HIV prevention, care, and treatment services. Notable among the successes has been a significant number of community-based care programs for orphans and vulnerable children, care and support programs for people living with HIV/AIDS, increased access of pregnant women to Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission services, establishment of a network of trained volunteer caregivers and peer educators, a significant number of Zambians accessing Anti-retrovrial Therapy and a decrease in the prevalence of HIV from 15.6 percent to 14.3 percent between 2001 and 2007.

In Indonesia a ribbon cutting ceremony for the Information Computer Technology (ICT) lab at the Al-Ahliyah religious junior secondary school (Madrasah) in Karawang, West Java.  The event highlights a public/private partnership to support quality and relevance of education through strengthening the use of ICT in education.  The school will receive a state-of-the-art computer lab, with equipment, software and educational resources from private sector partners.  USAID is providing teacher training and support, The Office of Defense Cooperation has also provided resources for construction of the lab building and donated staff time and resources.

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