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Archives for Photo of the Week

Photo of the Week: Celebrating Mothers Everywhere

During the month of May, we have been highlighting USAID’s work in Global Health. Global health plays a critical role in ending extreme poverty — with a particular focus on ending preventable child and maternal deaths, and creating an AIDS-free generation. The first part of the month, from May 1-10, we focused on the role that science, technology and innovation plays in global health. In celebration of mothers everywhere, we will be featuring the important role of mothers and partnerships in Global Health during May 11-17. Future highlights include AIDS-Free Generation (May 18-27), Family Planning (May 27-June 2), Nutrition (June 3-8). Photo is from PATH/Satvir Malhotra.

Follow USAID for Global Health (@USAIDGH) on Twitter and use #GHMatters to join in the conversation.

Photo of the Week: Administrator Shah in North Colombia

Last week, Administrator Shah met with displaced families in Corozal, Sucre in Northern Colombia at a land titling event, and received a warm “thank you” from one of the community members. Photo is from USAID.

Catching Mosquitoes, Not Fish: Returning Bed Nets to their Proper Use in the DRC

During the month of May, IMPACT will be highlighting USAID’s work in Global Health. From May 1-10, we will be featuring the role that Science, Technology & Innovation plays in Global Health.

It is 1 p.m. in the village of Kavimvira. The sun is high over Lake Tanganyika, at the foot of the Mitumba Mountain, in scenic South Kivu. Frank Baraka has packed the bounty of the morning fishing trip and folded his nets, when his cell phone chimes to signal an incoming text message: : “Sleep every night under an Insecticide-Treated Net (ITN), to protect your family from malaria,” he reads out loud, amused, to his fishing companion.

Frank Baraka sewing a bed net that he will use as a fishing net. Photo Credit: USAID

“This is exactly the message my wife has been pounding at home lately,” Roger Amisi responds. “She says that she heard it at the ETL (Education-Through-Listening) meeting, with Nathalie, you know, the primary school teacher.”

Delaying his lunch, Frank hurries to Nathalie Niéla’s compound to find out about the messages.  ”Malaria kills children in our community,” Nathalie says. “Sleep under a net every night, to live safe from malaria,” she confirms.

This is the call to action of the Malaria 3+1 Campaign implemented by USAID’s Democratic Republic of Congo-Integrated Health Project (DRC-IHP), in partnership with C-Change. An estimated 140,949 Congolese from 194 villages were exposed to campaign messages on malaria awareness and prevention. In a country where only five percent of pregnant women receive proper preventive malaria therapy, and malaria accounts for nearly 40 percent of child deaths, prevention is a critical priority.

Nathalie is one of 37 women ETL facilitators recently trained in the DRC-IHP’s field office of Uvira.  ”Thanks to ETL, our husbands no longer use the nets to fish or to protect vegetable gardens,” she affirms proudly. “Nets now serve their purpose of protecting children and pregnant women from mosquito bites.”

ETL is one pillar of IHP’s Tuendeni-Kumpala Behavior Change Communication strategy which empowers communities to adopt health-seeking behaviors. Tuendeni-Kumpala which means “moving forward” in Swahili and Tshiluba (two local languages), is an integrated strategy in which ETL facilitators work in synergy with other innovative communication approaches such as mobile technology, to increase the reach and enhance the behavioral impact of project interventions such as malaria prevention and use of reproductive health services.

Through this partnership between USAID, DRC-IHP and C-Change, a total of 64,584 ITNs were distributed across Bukavu, Kolwezi, Uvira, and Kamina, supporting the effort to boost the number of people using insecticide-treated nets.  Campaign results from two health zones point to the value of ETL, in terms of actual ITN use. After four months, 89 percent of the 9,471 households exposed to campaign activities in Uvira slept every night under an ITN.  By contrast, 82 percent of the 12,965 households involved in Kamina (Katanga province) reported adoption of the preventive behavior. When the campaign was launched in June 2012, ETL was not yet rolled out in Kamina.

For the project’s communication team, the difference illustrates the powerful effect of ETL. “ETL truly shows results here,” said Donat Ngoyi, DRC-IHP Communication Expert in Uvira.  ”This approach will, no doubt, help us meet our malaria prevention and treatment goals.”

The DRC-Integrated Health Project (DRC-IHP) — a five-year USAID cooperative agreement led by Management Sciences for Health in partnership with the International Rescue Committee, and Overseas Strategic Consulting, Ltd — is strengthening the leadership and governance capacity of people working in the health sector to improve the access, availability, and quality of services within 80 target health zones.

Follow USAID for Global Health (@USAIDGH) on Twitter and use #GHMatters to join in the conversation.

Photo of the Week: Department of Choco in Colombia Celebrates 200 Years of Independence

On February 1, 2013, the Department of Chocó (Pacific Coast), one of the Colombian departments with the largest Afro-Colombian population, celebrated 200 years of independence (1813-2013).  The United States Agency for International Development supported this commemoration as well as the development of several initiatives aimed at improving the living conditions of the Afro-Colombian and Indigenous population in the region.

On April 29-30, Administrator Shah travels to Colombia with Mark Feierstein, Assistant Administrator for Latin American and the Caribbean to meet with President Juan Manuel Santos and other senior government officials to discuss economic and social development initiatives and aspects of the ongoing peace process.

Read more about the Administrator’s trip to Colombia.

Visit USAID Colombia for more information about USAID’s work in Colombia.

Follow @rajshah on Twitter for updates of his trip.

Photo of the Week: Invest in the Future: Defeat Malaria

Malaria kills more than 650,000 people each year; the majority of those deaths occurring on the African continent. Each year, World Malaria Day (April 25) commemorates the global fight toward zero malaria deaths and mobilizes action to combat malaria. This year’s theme is “Invest in the Future: Defeat Malaria.” On this occasion, the President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI), led by the U.S. Agency for International Development and implemented together with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), will release its Seventh Annual Report to Congress, which describes the U.S. Government’s contributions to the global fight against malaria. Photo is from Jaclyn Wong, CDC.

USAID’s Global Health Bureau is working with United States Africa Command and partners all day on April 25 for a Twitter relay.  Join @USAfricaCommand from 6 – 10 a.m. EDT, then join @USAIDGH and partners starting at 9:30 a.m. EDT.  Medical experts and malaria prevention specialists will be standing by live to answer your questions. Additionally, Admiral Timothy Ziemer, U.S. Global Malaria Coordinator and leader of the U.S. President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI), will join the chat from 9:30 – 10 a.m. EDT. View the full schedule.

Join the conversation with #malariabuzz on Twitter.

Learn more about World Malaria Day.

 

Photo of the Week: President Obama Visits West Bank

On March 21, President Barack Obama joined President Abbas of the Palestinian Authority in Ramallah, West Bank to deliver remarks to the Palestinian people. The President remarked, “I was last here five years ago, and it’s a pleasure to be back — to see the progress that’s happened since my last visit, but also to bear witness to the enduring challenges to peace and security that so many Palestinians seek. I’ve returned to the West Bank because the United States is deeply committed to the creation of an independent and sovereign state of Palestine.” He added that “young Palestinians and young Israelis… deserve a better future than one that is continually defined by conflict.” During his trip, the President visited with some children at a USAID-funded center. Photo is from Muhannad Mansour from the Al Bireh Youth Development and Resource Center.

View photos from the President’s trip to the Middle East.

Learn more about USAID’s work in the West Bank and Gaza. Follow USAID West Bank/Gaza on Facebook and Twitter (@USAIDWBG).

Photo of the Week: Celebrating World Water Day

In Niger, a nine year old girl with a brother or sister on her back and about 25 pounds of water on her head. She just walked 3.2 miles one way to fetch this dirty water. She does this three times a day — everyday. Photo Credit: Gil Garcetti

Photo of the Week: Helping Youth in El Salvador

Assistant Administrator for Latin America and the Caribbean Mark Feierstein with youth in El Salvador. Photo Credit: Juan Quintero, U.S. Embassy Public Affairs 

USAID Assistant Administrator for Latin America and the Caribbean Mark Feierstein joins youth from San Martin in sports activities organized in their municipalities as part of their crime prevention projects. USAID/El Salvador recently launched a $42 million public-private alliance called “SolucionES” (“Solutions”) to help local governments and citizens to prevent crime at the municipal level.

Photos of the Week: International Mother Language Day

A teacher in Kati, Mali instructs her class. Photo credit: Dana Schmidt

February 21, 2013 marks International Mother Language Day! To celebrate its 14th anniversary, USAID recognizes education and literacy programs operated by our missions around the globe. There are more than 6,000 languages in the world and 50 percent of them are dying. International Mother Language Day not only promotes linguistic and cultural diversity, it brings attention a need to preserve it.

Learning in a mother language (first language) is incredibly important to children’s development and education. It improves school outcomes, reduces repetition and reduces dropout. Children who are educated in their mother tongue are significantly more likely to be enrolled and attend school. Additionally, children learn to read faster if they speak the language of instruction, because they already have vocabulary, knowledge of the construction of the language and  the ability to pronounce the sounds of the language.

Join the conversation on Twitter (@USAIDEducation) and use hashtag #MotherLanguage Day!

In Uganda, a teacher helps a student in front of the class. Photo credit: Dana Schmidt

 

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