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USAID Applauds Launch of the 2013 WHO Global Tuberculosis Report

I applaud the World Health Organization (WHO) today on the release of the Global Tuberculosis Report 2013, which includes among its recommendations, a call to action to reach millions of people still awaiting quality tuberculosis (TB) care and a stronger approach to fighting the emerging threat of multidrug-resistant TB.

While this year’s report is an important reminder that TB continues to claim millions of lives globally, it also demonstrates that significant progress in preventing, detecting, and curing people of the world’s second biggest infectious killer can be made through strong political will, adequate resources, and a focus on the poorest and most vulnerable communities around the world.

On the positive, we are seeing a steady decline in TB mortality rates since 1990, bringing us closer to the UN Millennium Development Goal to halve TB prevalence and deaths by 2015, with fewer people now falling ill from the disease. However, as the report warns, large numbers of individuals with TB still remain undetected and untreated, and hard to treat multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB is now on the rise.

The WHO recommendations are based on new data from almost 200 countries and territories around the world. The report includes the most recent numbers on people who became sick or died from TB, MDR-TB and TB/HIV, as well as lives saved, treatment successes and gaps, and recent progress in roll-out of new TB diagnostics.

Out of the five priority actions recommend in the report, I would like to highlight two key challenges in particular. First, we should make every effort to reach the 3 million people a year (“missed” patients as the report calls them) who get ill with TB but don’t receive the quality care they urgently need. Many of these people are among the most vulnerable and stigmatized, often at the bottom of the social spectrum.  Universal health coverage and poverty alleviation are critical for bridging this gap and providing better access and quality TB services to those at risk.

Second, the global health community must have a strong plan of attack for addressing the alarming increase in MDR-TB. Data in the WHO report show that progress towards targets for diagnosis and treatment of MDR-TB is far off-track. Worldwide, and in most countries with a high burden of MDR-TB, less than 25% of the people estimated to have MDR-TB were detected in 2012.   MDR-TB is not only a tragedy for the patient, the effects can be disastrous, as an entire community can become infected with the drug-resistant organisms.

USAID is leading the charge in both of these areas by expanding access and quality of TB services including further prevention of the disease through interventions such as contact tracing and infection control.  We are also collaborating with countries and partners to introduce and scale-up MDR-TB programs in countries with the highest burden. If successful, The USAID-funded STREAM study will be a significant win in the fight against MDR-TB.   This innovative study will not only reduce the treatment regimen for MDR-TB from the current 20+ months to 9 months, it will also result in considerable cost savings to the health care system and in alleviating suffering by the patient. Until then, we must optimize DOTS programs and improve infection control to prevent the creation and transmission of MDR-TB.

The United States has a strong record of success in partnering with local governments, civil societies and the private sector to harness the power of science, technology and innovation to deliver health better, more effectively, and at lower cost.  Rapid acceptance of new tools, through technology transfer, and support for path breaking research will be essential in ensuring that at-risk communities can benefit from new innovations in our fight against TB.

The U.S. Government remains a major contributor to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria, a unique partnership of governments, the private sector, civil society and affected communities joined together, unanimous in their desire to fight TB. Many low-income countries rely heavily on international donor funding, with the Global Fund providing around 75% of these financial resources. We need to ensure continued leadership in financing for high burden TB programs while advocating for increases in domestic resources to close the resource gaps, estimated at about US $2 billion per year. Commitment from the international community is crucial for addressing this funding gap.

Investing in global health is not only the smart thing to do – it is the right thing to do. We stand together with WHO and our international partners to save lives from TB and other diseases, and to develop healthier societies in the countries with the most need. We are also pleased to support the documentation and analysis of trends in diagnosis, treatment, and outcome. These data are essential to informing national programs and donor strategies.

I congratulate WHO, our other global partners, and the governments of high burden countries around the world for their leadership in global TB control and look forward to continued progress in this area.

Learn more about USAID’s tuberculosis programs.

Get details on the 2013 WHO Global Tuberculosis Report.

A New App Puts Tariff Codes at Traders’ Fingertips

Smartphone enthusiasts can find just about anything on the app store to entertain, connect with friends and learn new things that make our lives more enjoyable and productive. And this month, a new app is out that will make it easier for traders to do business in Vietnam.

Most of us have never had to look up an HS Code.  But there is one for just about every item used in daily life. Your coffee cup, your pen, your office furniture — maybe even what you had for lunch — all have a code in the Harmonized System (HS).

A woman tries the STAR Plus app. Photo credit: USAID Vietnam

A woman tries the STAR Plus app. Photo credit: USAID Vietnam

These internationally standardized classification codes cover 5,300 articles or commodities organized under headings and subheadings, arranged in 99 chapters, and grouped in 21 sections. Sound overwhelming? It can be. Because HS codes inform tariff rates, choosing the correct one is not only required by international law, but it can mean the difference between competitive or noncompetitive margins of cost for entrepreneurs who move goods across borders. Not long ago, HS classification information was hard to find and hard to navigate. Misclassification of HS codes is a common complaint of businesses in Vietnam. But now, thanks to our USAID STAR Plus Program, there’s an app for that.

The new Mã HS Việt Nam app, developed by USAID STAR Plus and available for free on iTunes, links traders directly to the Vietnam Customs website and places HS Code data at the fingertips of importers and exporters with iPhones or iPads. If and when Vietnam successfully joins the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement, or TPP, having easily accessible HS Codes with new tariff rate data will be very advantageous.

The Mã HS Vietnam app is just one example of the innovation and adaptability of our program in Vietnam. USAIDSTAR Plus and its predecessor projects date back to 2001 and are credited with helping Vietnam implement a Bilateral Trade Agreement with the United States and accede to the World Trade Organization — two achievements acknowledged by many to be the foundation of Vietnam’s dramatic economic rise from developing to middle-income country status in less than a decade. The secret to USAID STAR’s success has been agility of program design combined with responsiveness, particularly to long-standing relationships of trust and mutual interest established over time with the people and Government of Vietnam.

Working successfully with Vietnam’s General Department of Customs to streamline processes, create business-to-government partnerships and align operations to international best practices in trade compliance are just a few of the project’s contributions. Similar progress is evident through other counterpart relationships, such as work with the National Assembly and the State Audit of Vietnam. Rule of law, banking and finance, fiscal transparency, and civic participation are all areas improved during the USAID STAR Plus era of informed cooperation. By remaining committed to innovation and adaptability the U.S.-Vietnam partnership will continue to achieve more inclusive, sustainable, and transformative growth long into the future.

Download and try out the Ma HS Vietnam app.

Learn more about what USAID is doing in the area of mobile solutions

Food Assistance by the Numbers

World Food Day was October 16. 

There are some numbers that we are all too familiar with that make ending hunger seem daunting.

  • 842 million people suffer from chronic hunger worldwide.
  • One in six children in the developing world are underweight.
  • One in four children in the developing world are stunted.

But what about those other numbers? What about the numbers that show how much we can do and are doing every day to make sure that people have enough to eat? USAID food assistance programs feed people in emergency contexts and engage in longer-term development activities so that one day we can live in a world where no one needs food assistance.

Beneficiaries of food distribution in Bangladesh. Photo credit: Save the Children

Beneficiaries of food distribution in Bangladesh. Photo credit: Save the Children

So, in remembering World Food Day 2013, let’s look at some of those numbers:

  • 52 Million

People who benefited from USAID food assistance programs in FY 2012

Learn more about our FY 2012 programming here.

  • 59

Years that USAID’s Office of Food for Peace has been providing food assistance to hungry people around the world

  • 3 Billion

People who have benefited from USAID food assistance programs since they began in 1954

  • 150

Countries where USAID food assistance programs have operated

  • 1.5 Million

Tons of food that were distributed to hungry people around the world in FY 2012

  • 36

Countries where USAID-funded Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) monitors and analyzes relevant data and information in terms of its impacts on livelihoods and markets to identify potential threats to food security.

  • 10.7 Million

People who benefited from new tools USAID has to provide emergency food assistance in FY 2012, including locally and regionally purchased food, as well as cash transfers and food vouchers hungry people can use to buy food in local markets.

Click here to see how cash transfers are helping food insecure internally displaced persons in Somalia.

  • 6

New ready-to-use and emergency food products that USAID has developed since 2011 to better target the special nutritional needs of vulnerable groups.

Click here to see how we are partnering with the UN World Food Program to transport life-sustaining food bars purchased in the U.S. to Syrian refugees in Erbil, Iraq.

So remembering World Food Day, and those 842 million people who are still hungry, let us also remember the United States’ sustained commitment to improving conditions globally for hungry people. Let us remember the millions of people around the world who have benefited from the generosity and good will of the American people. And let us recommit to reaching those who still need our help because in 2013, no one should struggle to feed their children or go to bed hungry.

Learn more about how USAID is working to reduce hunger and malnutrition through Food for Peace

USAID in the News

The Guardian reported that USAID and the Department for International Development (DfID) in the UK will be joining forces in Mozambique to fight against trachoma, a disease that is the world’s leading cause of preventable blindness. The first crucial step the organizations will undertake is mapping the areas to determine where people are at risk of blindness from the disease, which will help identify where prevention measures, distribution of medicine, and surgery are most needed. The goal of the program, set forth in a World Health Assembly resolution in 1998, is to eliminate blindness caused by trachoma by 2020.

GMA News Online of the Philippines highlighted USAID relief funding and assistance for victims of the 7.2 magnitude earthquake that affected the Central Visayas region early this week. Simultaneously, hygiene kits will be made available to earthquake victims through USAID’s VisayasHealth Project.

AllAfrica reported that USAID will invest $25 million on orphans and vulnerable children in Nigeria. The project, which seeks to improve the wellbeing of 500,000 vulnerable children and 125,000 caregivers, will target local governments and strengthen the organizational systems and technical capacity of the Ministries of Women Affairs and Social Development.

Science Daily detailed the results of a USAID-supported study that examined the safety, efficacy, and acceptability of a one-year contraceptive vaginal ring (CVR). The results of the study, which demonstrated a positive response to the new contraceptive, indicated that the CVR could have a substantial impact as a resource for women in developing countries who lack convenient access to a health care facilities or reliable electricity. Currently, a wide range of obstacles prevent women in developing countries from accessing effective contraceptive methods.

Sun Star had an announcement that the city of Cagayan de Oro in Misamis Oriental province of the Philippines has been chosen by USAID as a pilot city for two-year development project. The project, called Investment Enabling Environment (INVEST), will seek to turn the city into an economic hub by streamlining business processes and improving investment planning and promotion. Government officials in Cagayan de Oro expect the project to boost local business and create employment opportunities in the city.

AllAfrica reported on a joint effort between USAID and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) that will increase rice production in Nigeria. The project, which will work to boost agriculture and ensure rural development, is part of an effort to boost economic activity. Farmers in Nigeria will be given access to tools and resources to increase their income and raise their standard of living.

Communities in Cote d’Ivoire Benefit from USAID’s Investments

USAID is helping communities in rural Cote d’Ivoire develop economic resiliency. Through our partners SAVE the Children and AVSI, we are supporting several types of economic strengthening activities, all of which increase the productive resources available for families. Through this work, we target the families and caregivers of children orphaned or made vulnerable by HIV/AIDS.

As they gathered for their savings group meeting, group members met us with a traditional welcome. Andrea Halverson. Photo credit: Andrea Halverson, USAID

As they gathered for their savings group meeting, group members met us with a traditional welcome. Photo credit: Andrea Halverson, USAID

In the mountainous, western city of Man, near Cote d’Ivoire’s border with Liberia, we met women gathering for their regular community savings group meeting. This region was one of the hardest hit during Cote d’Ivoire’s civil unrest. With poverty rates increasing over the past decade, savings groups combat a common problem in developing countries: lack of access to credit. Through these self-selected groups, members (usually all-women) will share a small portion of their money at each bi-monthly meeting, and are eligible to take loans, with interest, from this shared pool. At the end of the group sharing cycle, the amount saved is paid out to the group members. The additional money is making a difference in their lives and the lives of their children. Almost every woman uses her savings for school fees and school uniforms for her children.

Children watch as the community members cook the Attiéké, the final step in its production. Photo credit: Andrea Halverson, USAID

Children watch as the community members cook the Attiéké, the final step in its production. Photo credit: Andrea Halverson, USAID

In addition to savings groups, we also visited a community who had received start-up capital to fund a small business activity, producing a local delicacy called attiéké. Similar to couscous, attiéké is a fermented Ivoiran side dish, highly sought after in the region. Through the donation of a mill and a creative cassava partnership, the women had what they needed to start their small business. They are now making and selling attiéké. With pride, women told us of their informal distribution channels that stretched all the way to Mali. These and other investments are helping shape the future of Cote d’Ivoire, and reducing the vulnerability of Ivorian children by using profits to ensure they can enroll in school.

USAID in the News

AllAfrica reported on a newly-announced USAID partnership with the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund USA and the Nelson Mandela Children’s Hospital Trust, which is aimed at supporting the proposed Nelson Mandela Children’s Hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa. The new hospital, scheduled to open in June 2015, will provide high-quality medical care to children regardless of their social or economic status.

A statue of Nelson Mandela was unveiled on Sep. 21, 2013 at the Embassy of South Africa in Washington, DC. Photo credit: USAID

A statue of Nelson Mandela was unveiled on Sep. 21, 2013 at the Embassy of South Africa in Washington, DC. Photo credit: USAID

The Express Tribune featured a story about the fourth National Youth Peace Festival in Lahore, Pakistan, which is being supported in part by USAID. The organizers expects to see 500 young people from across Pakistan attend the festival, the theme of which is “One Nation, One Agenda; Democracy and Peace.” Politicians will attend the festival in hopes of engaging youth by taking up issues that are relevant to them.

Jamaica Observer reported USAID’s tool donation  to 105 cocoa farmers in Jamaica as a part of a two-year project, which focuses on “protecting rural lives, livelihoods and ecosystems” in communities affected by climate change. The tools will be used by farmers to combat the negative effects of climate change on agriculture.

Vibe Ghana detailed USAID efforts to support the Western Regional Health Directorate in Ghana. USAID contributions to the health directorate include training, performance-based grants, and equipment that will be distributed throughout district hospitals and health care centers. Dr. Edward Bonko, Leader of the Focus Region Health Project of USAID, explained that the efforts would assist with “maternal, reproductive and child health, HIV/AIDS and malaria preventions and neonatal care” in the Western Region.

Pakistan’s The Nation reported on the visit of a group of U.S. government officials, including USAID Mission Director for Pakistan Gregory Gottleib, to the Jamshoro Thermal Power Station. The power plant will provide an additional 270 megawatts of power to the national grid.  In addition to the Jamshoro power plant, USAID is working to rehabilitate thermal plants in Muzaffargarh and Guddu and a hydro-plant in Tarbela.

The website OpenEqualFree detailed a USAID effort to educate student gardeners in Liberia through the Advancing Youth Project—a partnership with Liberia’s Ministry of Education and community organizations that offers “alternative basic education services and entrepreneurship training for young people across Liberia.” The initiative will provide agricultural experts to train students to grow their own gardens and teach them the about agribusiness as a possible career choice.

The Hill featured a piece written by Representatives Albio Sires and Mario Diaz-Balart spotlighting USAID efforts to combat tuberculosis. The story, which describes legislation geared toward encouraging development of health care products in low-resource health systems, includes an overview of USAID’s contributions in the area of research and development in global health, saying, “As a leading funder of breakthrough products for global health, USAID is a key partner in later-stage research that ensures the development of safe and effective health tools.”

Taking Our New Model of LGBT Inclusive Development to UNGA

This year’s United Nations General Assembly focuses on the realization of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and inclusive development goals for persons with disabilities.

This week during United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) meetings, USAID made important connections with leaders from other development organizations and private-sector institutions that work to advance global development. Among the topics explored was how we can collaborate to promote inclusive development, ensure equal access to foreign aid, and protect the human rights of one of the world’s most vulnerable populations – lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people.

Around the world, LGBT individuals are often among those who least enjoy the benefits from human rights protections, opportunities, and freedoms; they often face discrimination, harassment and violence and are regularly excluded from receiving public services.  Eighty-three countries still criminalize LGBT behavior and seven countries impose the death penalty for same-sex relations.  In some countries the lived experience for LGBT people is getting worse.

Protecting the human rights of LGBT people around the world represents a difficult challenge yet USAID is leading. And USAID can lead more effectively in partnership with others. As a global community we must leverage our resources and technical expertise to effectively and efficiently further LGBT global equality. As Administrator Shah pointed out in the Agency’s 2013 annual letter, collaboration and partnerships are powerful ways to harness the public and private sectors as engines of growth, innovation, and development expertise.

USAID’s LGBT Global Development Partnership promotes foreign assistance to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) equality in emerging markets and developing countries. Photo by: Pat Adams/USAID

USAID’s LGBT Global Development Partnership promotes foreign assistance to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) equality in emerging markets and developing countries. Photo by: Pat Adams/USAID

I had the privilege this week at UNGA to participate in a meeting centered on USAID’s goal to promote LGBT equality through collaboration with others. USAID, the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida), the Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice, and the Ford Foundation convened public and private donors to strengthen relationships between and among government donors, private foundations, and the businesses supporting LGBT development issues globally. We identified areas for shared learning and increased future collaboration.

At this meeting I was particularly proud to share how USAID has already made great strides with partners to secure better lives for LGBT people, their families, and their communities around the world. USAID’s LGBT Global Development Partnership launched earlier this year brings together a broad coalition of public and private sector partners who are leveraging their joint resources and expertise to advance LGBT equality in the developing world. It aims to strengthen the capacity of local LGBT civil society organizations, train LGBT leaders in how to participate more effectively in democratic processes, and undertake research on the economic cost of discrimination against LGBT individuals. With 12 resource partners co-investing $12 million, it is the largest LGBT global equality initiative.

Last month I had the privilege to witness this partnership in action when I visited a training in Colombia conducted by the Victory Institute for 30 local LGBT people interested in running for political office or managing campaigns.  It was the second such training in just three months–brought back by local demand, as the first training was over-subscribed by 500 percent.

While the challenges remain great, USAID should be proud that it put LGBT inclusive development through public-private partnership on the UNGA agenda this year. I am excited that USAID is taking a leading role in convening partners to solve this very important development problem. Individually, and even more so collectively, strategic investments in global LGBT equality can make a very positive impact on the lives of people around the world.

Learn more about this year’s United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) and its focus on the realization of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and inclusive development goals for persons with disabilities.

Meeting the President: How the United States is Helping Women Farmers in Senegal

This originally appeared on the Feed the Future Blog

When I learned that I had been chosen to present my work with women farmers in Senegal to the president of the United States, the first thing I did was cry.

A minute later my thoughts cleared.

I have important things to tell President Obama, I said to myself, about how women farmers have benefited enormously from partnership with the United States.

Since 2002, I have been a member of a farmer organization of some 600 members—two thirds of whom are women—that works in 52 villages in the rural community of Mampatim, Senegal. I also work for a nongovernmental organization, supported by USAID through the Feed the Future initiative, that helps the group’s members succeed.

Anna Gaye prepares to demonstrate rice milling to President Obama in Senegal in June 2013. Photo credit: Stephane Tourné

Anna Gaye prepares to demonstrate rice milling to President Obama in Senegal in June 2013. Photo credit: Stephane Tourné

Farming in the valley

Since upland farming areas are traditionally farmed by men, our women members are obliged to work in the valleys, often under difficult conditions due to flooding. With little organization, many of these women worked very hard with negligible results.

Membership in our organization, known as an economic interest group, affords members like me legal recognition through which we can obtain credit. Historically, our group, called Kissal Patim, enabled us to cultivate small garden patches near village wells that provide off-season vegetables for market, as well as larger half-acre rice plots that yielded perhaps 200 kilograms during the rainy season.

But our partnership with Feed the Future got us to think much bigger. Feed the Future introduced members of Kissal Patim to several recently developed strains of seed that can produce yields as much as three times greater while using less water!

Meeting the president

On the big day, my mouth was dry as President Obama approached the booth we had set up to exhibit our activities, but he put me at ease right away. First, I demonstrated a traditional method of rice processing. I tried not to smile as he took the heavy ram from my hands and started pounding the pestle himself. “That’s painful!” the president said through his translator, examining his hands a minute later.

“That’s what women lived with every day before our partnership with Feed the Future,” I said.

That partnership brought, among other benefits, a portable, electric rice mill, which was also on display. The mill takes only 20 minutes to separate 40 kilograms of rice, which previously would take an entire day. The president was curious as to who actually owned the machine, and I explained our group manages it for our common use.

The mill, I explained, was very important to our progress. My fellow farmers and I were initially reluctant to grow more rice since the task of having to pound so much more would be huge. Our acquisition of the milling machines changed all that. We were free from the drudgery of the pestle.

The time saved also gives us more time to engage in commercial activities, such as the production and sale of palm oil and nutritious rice porridge made ​​with peanuts, not to mention time to prepare for the next growing season.

President Obama congratulated and encouraged us.

The visit was like a dream. The president of the United States! As soon as it was over, I was eager to get back to Mampatim and tell the story to my fellow women producers.

The visit had a positive impact on all our work: I feel more courageous and ambitious, and the photos I showed my colleagues inspired them to redouble their efforts in their production plots. It has created a spirit of competition among them all!

Begun in 2010, this partnership with Feed the Future through USAID’s Economic Growth Project has helped women access several new varieties of high-yielding rice, as well as introduce fertilizers that have further increased yields. Some of the plots have grown fourfold, up to an entire hectare, each of which yields and average of four-and-a-half tons. In the future, we hope to manage even larger plots.

(Translated from French by Zack Taylor)

This post is part of a series of posts by marketplace participants who met Obama in June 2013.

Additional Resources: 

The Bright Side of Taxes: More than Just a Headache

Many people equate taxes with confusing forms, incomprehensible rules, and general feelings of frustration. Others fear potential audits or vent about the ways in which their governments spend tax revenues. People pay less attention to the positive side of taxation; namely, that the resulting revenues allow a government to provide critical goods and services to citizens.

Tax revenues support both large-scale investments in areas such as health, education, citizen security, and roads, as well as community-level goods and services, like public lighting and garbage collection. Of course, efforts to improve tax collection should go hand-in-hand with advancements in public financial management more broadly. That is, beyond simply collecting more taxes, governments should improve the way they handle and invest public resources. Low revenue collection and sub-par public financial management practices have serious implications for the everyday lives and operations of citizens and businesses.

Click to read USAID's Detailed Guidelines for Improved Tax Administration in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Click to read USAID’s Detailed Guidelines for Improved Tax Administration in Latin America and the Caribbean.

For example, countries like El Salvador are facing crumbling public school infrastructure, a lack of basic medicines in public hospitals, and delayed tax refunds to businesses. Even in Brazil, a country with tax collection levels on par with the most developed countries in the world, recent protests have highlighted citizens’ discontent with the government’s management of public resources.

Along with promoting private investment, the ability of governments to collect and manage tax revenues is fundamental to reducing their reliance on foreign aid over the long term. As the Assistant Administrator for USAID’s Bureau for Latin America and the Caribbean, Mark Feierstein, noted in testimony earlier this year:

“The most important source of development funding for nearly any country is not USAID, or any other donor, but internally generated revenue. Absent sufficient host country funding, donors alone will not produce sustained prosperity and opportunity. That is why we are initiating new programs to help national and local governments raise revenue.”

Many readers may be surprised to find that, despite recent economic and social advances in the region, many Latin American and Caribbean countries seriously struggle to collect and manage public revenues.

Last year, two researchers from the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) found that tax collection rates in Latin America averaged 18.4% of GDP, or roughly half the average of 34.8% for countries (including the United States) that belong to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and 39.2% in the European Union. More shocking is that collection rates in Latin America are significantly lower than the 24.5% average that the researchers found in Sub-Saharan Africa. Meanwhile, the World Bank has noted that Latin American countries lag behind international standards in various aspects of public financial management, such as procurement, budget execution, and independent oversight of public expenditures.

Increasingly in recent years, the international community has emphasized the need for countries to improve the collection and management of tax revenues. USAID is providing leadership on these issues throughout the Americas. Our programs are working with national governments in countries like El Salvador and Jamaica to strengthen tax administration and public financial management.

USAID is a key contributor to the U.S. Government’s Domestic Finance for Development (DF4D) policy initiative that encourages countries throughout the world to increase revenue collection, improve budget transparency, and fight corruption. For example, we are challenging local governments at the municipal level in El Salvador and Honduras to increase revenue collection and improve the management of those resources. We will reward the highest performers with additional resources for key investments related to citizen security in their communities.

Today, USAID released a new publication entitled “Detailed Guidelines for Improved Tax Administration in Latin America and the Caribbean” that will enable tax administrations (i.e., the IRS equivalent in each country) to assess their own performance against leading practices in a variety of areas, including taxpayer registration, filing and payments, collections, and audit, among others. This tool will also help USAID staff and other donors engage with tax administrations on potential areas of technical assistance and prioritize interventions.

At USAID, we want to see all countries reach a level of development where they no longer require development assistance. Helping ensure that governments can mobilize domestic resources and invest them in their own development is a key step toward reaching that goal.

Learn more about USAID’s work in improving tax administration in Latin America and the Caribbean

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