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Photo of the Week: USAID Celebrates 52 Years of Progress

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On November 1, USAID will celebrate its 52nd birthday! Two years ago, we celebrated our 50th anniversary. This year, we will take a look back at some of our programs and see what we have accomplished and how we plan to move forward.

We’ll be highlighting our work in innovation, energy (including Power Africa), building resilience to recurrent crisis, supplying food aid to curb malnutrition, ending preventable child deaths, and our overall mission to end extreme poverty within the next two decades. We’d like to take this opportunity to applaud the dedication of our partners and those working tirelessly at USAID missions around the world who have helped us achieve ongoing progress.

Celerate with us and join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter using hashtag #USAIDprogress!

USAID in the News

Carribbean 360 detailed a new program launched by USAID to improve nutrition and access to locally produced foods in an effort to prevent hunger in the most vulnerable households in Haiti. A large focus of the program, which is a part of the U.S. Government’s global hunger and food security initiative, will be on developing the agriculture sector in Haiti. Combined with the use of food vouchers, improved nutrition education, and better quality health and nutrition services, the program is expected to reach 250,000 households.

Food distribution in Haiti. Photo credit:  Osterman

Food distribution in Haiti. Photo credit: Osterman

Nehanda Radio featured a story on the $10 million increase in food assistance granted to Zimbabwe by USAID’s Office for Food and Peace. This funding will go to feeding the 2.2 million people who require food assistance in Zimbabwe, particularly during the hunger season, which is expected to affect 32% more people than it did last year. Melissa Williams, the USAID Mission Director in Zimbabwe said about the project, “Although the U.S. Government and other major donors are transitioning assistance in Zimbabwe from humanitarian relief to promoting sustainable development, humanitarian assessments continue to indicate that significant numbers of people in Zimbabwe still require seasonal assistance to meet their minimum food needs.”

The Nation (Pakistan) reported on a meeting between the Pakistani Federal Minister for Planning, Development and Reforms, Prof. Ahsan Iqbal, and USAID Mission Director for Pakistan, Gregory Gottleib, where the Federal Minister praised USAID for economic and social support in the country and discussed important areas of study and focus to address as the partnership moves forward.

News Medical covered two five-year awards from USAID to International Partnership for Microbicides (IPM) to advance new HIV prevention tools for women and ensure that they will be available to the countries where they are most needed. “Women urgently need a range of new tools that are tailored to their needs, and to the complex social, cultural and behavioral realities they face,” said Dr. Lee Claypool, USAID Biologist. “To beat the epidemic, we must continuously invest in innovative HIV prevention tools for women.”

CarDekho reported on a certificate of recognition given to Volkswagen India at the USAID-organized International Conference on Promoting Water Use Efficiency in Urban Sector to Address Climate Change. Volkswagen India received the recognition for eco-friendly measures they have taken to minimize their impact on the environment. Many of Volkswagen India’s initiatives have focused on adopting measures to reduce the consumption in fresh water, with scarcity being a problem in the area.

Pounds of Prevention: Focus on India

Assistance in India after two cyclones hit the regionIn October 1999, two cyclones hit the eastern coast of India, and the impact was devastating with nearly 10,000 lives lost. This October, another strong cyclone, Phailin, hit the country and the death toll has been reported at about 50. In this installment of USAID’s Pounds of Prevention series, we explore what happened in the intervening years to bring about such a different result to two seemingly similar events and how USAID played a key role.

Benjamin Franklin is famous for the adage “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Today, we are faced with great challenges brought about by increasing population and urbanization, a changing climate, and a demonstrated increase in the frequency and severity of natural disasters. To continue to tackle these challenges, what has become clear is this: We need more than an ounce of prevention; we need pounds of prevention!

Photo is courtesy of the National Society for Earthquake Technology-Nepal.

FrontLines: What is Open Development?

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Read the latest edition of USAID’s FrontLines to learn how the Agency is embracing open development to further its work. Also in this issue, read about some of the places where USAID’s interests intersect with those of the U.S. military. Some highlights:

 

  • “What we are trying to do is be a global one-stop shop for a good idea.” Jeff Brown has more to say about the projects USAID’s three-year-old Development Innovation Ventures is backing and how those projects are faring in countries around the world.
  • Diving for lobster in Honduras’s Miskito Coast has left more than 1,000 divers disabled or dead since the 1970s and 1980s when the crustacean became popular on dinner menus. However, a large American restaurant chain is doing its part to ensure that practice ends alongside more than 80 local and international groups, businesses and government agencies
  • What’s next for USAID’s Saving Lives at Birth million dollar winners? Four inspired doctors talk about the innovations they’ve helped devise and their hopes for saving new moms’ lives as a result. 
  • A bustling secondary school farm in Jamaica can trace its roots of success to a collaboration between local police, U.S. soldiers and a group of determined parents and educators.
  • With half of Afghans living in a disaster belt studded with earthquakes, landslides and flooding, USAID and the U.S. military are helping the country’s citizens acquire the skills they need to survive natural disasters and save the lives of their neighbors.

If you want an e-mail reminder in your inbox when the latest issue of FrontLines has been posted online, subscribe here.

Knowledge-Sharing in MHealth is Critical to Providing Life-Saving Solutions for Moms

This originally appeared on the Mobile Alliance for Maternal Action Blog

Every minute at least one woman dies from complications related to pregnancy or childbirth and every year 6.6 million children die before the age of five. We know what interventions make a difference on maternal and infant mortality. We now know that one billion women in low to middle-income countries own a mobile phone – a tool that can be used to engage, educate, and empower mothers. In order for mobile to be scaled to address health issues, global communities must come together to openly share lessons learned, failures, best practices and introduce new solutions to help underserved populations – women in developing countries.

Participants looking pleased with access to health information on their mobile phones. Photo credit: Living Goods

Participants looking pleased with access to health information on their mobile phones. Photo credit: Living Goods

Mobile health (mHealth) is a solution for women, providing immediate, life-saving services to address dire maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) challenges. This emerging field – a global movement – is reaching mothers, who need health services the most. No one organization, ministry of health, or company can do it alone, which is why knowledge-sharing through a global, mobile community is needed more than ever.

In a new report, Sparking a Global Movement with MAMA (PDF), commissioned by Johnson & Johnson, a partner of the Mobile Alliance for Maternal Action (MAMA), over 230 organizations, from almost 60 countries downloaded MAMA’s free, adaptable vital health mobile messages. Organizations continue to use these messages to guide mothers through pregnancy and now up to their baby’s third birthday.  As a result, more organizations using these messages are sharing back their key findings and translated the messages in 20 languages. Because of these organizations, which include social enterprises, health organizations, and governments, we all have a new resource in the mHealth space focused on MNCH. MAMA, founded by USAID, Johnson & Johnson, UN Foundation, BabyCenter and mHealth Alliance, is getting critical health information out to mothers through partnerships around the world.

Having access to these culturally sensitive, vital health mobile messages is like “having a hospital at home,” said Nahura Sharon, a new mother in Uganda, receives mobile messages through Living Goods, an organization that empowers women and operates networks of micro-entrepreneurs, who provide life-changing products and services.

Other organizations like Liga Inan in Timor-Leste translated mobile messages in Tetum, a local language and are reaching mothers, family members and community health workers. In Tanzania, Wazazi Nipendeni, a national multi-media campaign on health pregnancy, is using vital health mobile messages in partnership with the Ministry of Health. In less than six months, Wazazi Nipendeni reached 150,000 active subscribers and delivered over nine million text messages.

The desire for knowledge-sharing continues to grow as well as the need for mobile content like messages for family planning and for mothers with children ages 1-3 years old.

This report and other knowledge-sharing resources help foster global learning and build alliances with a growing community interested in working together, aiming to save lives through mobile technology.

Kirsten Gagnaire is the Global Director of the Mobile Alliance for Maternal Action (MAMA). Prior to MAMA, Gagnaire was the Ghana Country Director for the Grameen Foundation and led the initial implementation of MOTECH.  She was the Founder of the Social Enterprise Group (SEG) and Sustayne, and has a depth of experience and passion for addressing social and environmental issues through profitable business ventures. Gagnaire was a consultant with KPMG Peat Marwick, specializing in management, technology, and organizational development consulting for health and human service agencies.

USAID Applauds Launch of the 2013 WHO Global Tuberculosis Report

I applaud the World Health Organization (WHO) today on the release of the Global Tuberculosis Report 2013, which includes among its recommendations, a call to action to reach millions of people still awaiting quality tuberculosis (TB) care and a stronger approach to fighting the emerging threat of multidrug-resistant TB.

While this year’s report is an important reminder that TB continues to claim millions of lives globally, it also demonstrates that significant progress in preventing, detecting, and curing people of the world’s second biggest infectious killer can be made through strong political will, adequate resources, and a focus on the poorest and most vulnerable communities around the world.

On the positive, we are seeing a steady decline in TB mortality rates since 1990, bringing us closer to the UN Millennium Development Goal to halve TB prevalence and deaths by 2015, with fewer people now falling ill from the disease. However, as the report warns, large numbers of individuals with TB still remain undetected and untreated, and hard to treat multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB is now on the rise.

The WHO recommendations are based on new data from almost 200 countries and territories around the world. The report includes the most recent numbers on people who became sick or died from TB, MDR-TB and TB/HIV, as well as lives saved, treatment successes and gaps, and recent progress in roll-out of new TB diagnostics.

Out of the five priority actions recommend in the report, I would like to highlight two key challenges in particular. First, we should make every effort to reach the 3 million people a year (“missed” patients as the report calls them) who get ill with TB but don’t receive the quality care they urgently need. Many of these people are among the most vulnerable and stigmatized, often at the bottom of the social spectrum.  Universal health coverage and poverty alleviation are critical for bridging this gap and providing better access and quality TB services to those at risk.

Second, the global health community must have a strong plan of attack for addressing the alarming increase in MDR-TB. Data in the WHO report show that progress towards targets for diagnosis and treatment of MDR-TB is far off-track. Worldwide, and in most countries with a high burden of MDR-TB, less than 25% of the people estimated to have MDR-TB were detected in 2012.   MDR-TB is not only a tragedy for the patient, the effects can be disastrous, as an entire community can become infected with the drug-resistant organisms.

USAID is leading the charge in both of these areas by expanding access and quality of TB services including further prevention of the disease through interventions such as contact tracing and infection control.  We are also collaborating with countries and partners to introduce and scale-up MDR-TB programs in countries with the highest burden. If successful, The USAID-funded STREAM study will be a significant win in the fight against MDR-TB.   This innovative study will not only reduce the treatment regimen for MDR-TB from the current 20+ months to 9 months, it will also result in considerable cost savings to the health care system and in alleviating suffering by the patient. Until then, we must optimize DOTS programs and improve infection control to prevent the creation and transmission of MDR-TB.

The United States has a strong record of success in partnering with local governments, civil societies and the private sector to harness the power of science, technology and innovation to deliver health better, more effectively, and at lower cost.  Rapid acceptance of new tools, through technology transfer, and support for path breaking research will be essential in ensuring that at-risk communities can benefit from new innovations in our fight against TB.

The U.S. Government remains a major contributor to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria, a unique partnership of governments, the private sector, civil society and affected communities joined together, unanimous in their desire to fight TB. Many low-income countries rely heavily on international donor funding, with the Global Fund providing around 75% of these financial resources. We need to ensure continued leadership in financing for high burden TB programs while advocating for increases in domestic resources to close the resource gaps, estimated at about US $2 billion per year. Commitment from the international community is crucial for addressing this funding gap.

Investing in global health is not only the smart thing to do – it is the right thing to do. We stand together with WHO and our international partners to save lives from TB and other diseases, and to develop healthier societies in the countries with the most need. We are also pleased to support the documentation and analysis of trends in diagnosis, treatment, and outcome. These data are essential to informing national programs and donor strategies.

I congratulate WHO, our other global partners, and the governments of high burden countries around the world for their leadership in global TB control and look forward to continued progress in this area.

Learn more about USAID’s tuberculosis programs.

Get details on the 2013 WHO Global Tuberculosis Report.

A New App Puts Tariff Codes at Traders’ Fingertips

Smartphone enthusiasts can find just about anything on the app store to entertain, connect with friends and learn new things that make our lives more enjoyable and productive. And this month, a new app is out that will make it easier for traders to do business in Vietnam.

Most of us have never had to look up an HS Code.  But there is one for just about every item used in daily life. Your coffee cup, your pen, your office furniture — maybe even what you had for lunch — all have a code in the Harmonized System (HS).

A woman tries the STAR Plus app. Photo credit: USAID Vietnam

A woman tries the STAR Plus app. Photo credit: USAID Vietnam

These internationally standardized classification codes cover 5,300 articles or commodities organized under headings and subheadings, arranged in 99 chapters, and grouped in 21 sections. Sound overwhelming? It can be. Because HS codes inform tariff rates, choosing the correct one is not only required by international law, but it can mean the difference between competitive or noncompetitive margins of cost for entrepreneurs who move goods across borders. Not long ago, HS classification information was hard to find and hard to navigate. Misclassification of HS codes is a common complaint of businesses in Vietnam. But now, thanks to our USAID STAR Plus Program, there’s an app for that.

The new Mã HS Việt Nam app, developed by USAID STAR Plus and available for free on iTunes, links traders directly to the Vietnam Customs website and places HS Code data at the fingertips of importers and exporters with iPhones or iPads. If and when Vietnam successfully joins the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement, or TPP, having easily accessible HS Codes with new tariff rate data will be very advantageous.

The Mã HS Vietnam app is just one example of the innovation and adaptability of our program in Vietnam. USAIDSTAR Plus and its predecessor projects date back to 2001 and are credited with helping Vietnam implement a Bilateral Trade Agreement with the United States and accede to the World Trade Organization — two achievements acknowledged by many to be the foundation of Vietnam’s dramatic economic rise from developing to middle-income country status in less than a decade. The secret to USAID STAR’s success has been agility of program design combined with responsiveness, particularly to long-standing relationships of trust and mutual interest established over time with the people and Government of Vietnam.

Working successfully with Vietnam’s General Department of Customs to streamline processes, create business-to-government partnerships and align operations to international best practices in trade compliance are just a few of the project’s contributions. Similar progress is evident through other counterpart relationships, such as work with the National Assembly and the State Audit of Vietnam. Rule of law, banking and finance, fiscal transparency, and civic participation are all areas improved during the USAID STAR Plus era of informed cooperation. By remaining committed to innovation and adaptability the U.S.-Vietnam partnership will continue to achieve more inclusive, sustainable, and transformative growth long into the future.

Download and try out the Ma HS Vietnam app.

Learn more about what USAID is doing in the area of mobile solutions

Food Assistance by the Numbers

World Food Day was October 16. 

There are some numbers that we are all too familiar with that make ending hunger seem daunting.

  • 842 million people suffer from chronic hunger worldwide.
  • One in six children in the developing world are underweight.
  • One in four children in the developing world are stunted.

But what about those other numbers? What about the numbers that show how much we can do and are doing every day to make sure that people have enough to eat? USAID food assistance programs feed people in emergency contexts and engage in longer-term development activities so that one day we can live in a world where no one needs food assistance.

Beneficiaries of food distribution in Bangladesh. Photo credit: Save the Children

Beneficiaries of food distribution in Bangladesh. Photo credit: Save the Children

So, in remembering World Food Day 2013, let’s look at some of those numbers:

  • 52 Million

People who benefited from USAID food assistance programs in FY 2012

Learn more about our FY 2012 programming here.

  • 59

Years that USAID’s Office of Food for Peace has been providing food assistance to hungry people around the world

  • 3 Billion

People who have benefited from USAID food assistance programs since they began in 1954

  • 150

Countries where USAID food assistance programs have operated

  • 1.5 Million

Tons of food that were distributed to hungry people around the world in FY 2012

  • 36

Countries where USAID-funded Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) monitors and analyzes relevant data and information in terms of its impacts on livelihoods and markets to identify potential threats to food security.

  • 10.7 Million

People who benefited from new tools USAID has to provide emergency food assistance in FY 2012, including locally and regionally purchased food, as well as cash transfers and food vouchers hungry people can use to buy food in local markets.

Click here to see how cash transfers are helping food insecure internally displaced persons in Somalia.

  • 6

New ready-to-use and emergency food products that USAID has developed since 2011 to better target the special nutritional needs of vulnerable groups.

Click here to see how we are partnering with the UN World Food Program to transport life-sustaining food bars purchased in the U.S. to Syrian refugees in Erbil, Iraq.

So remembering World Food Day, and those 842 million people who are still hungry, let us also remember the United States’ sustained commitment to improving conditions globally for hungry people. Let us remember the millions of people around the world who have benefited from the generosity and good will of the American people. And let us recommit to reaching those who still need our help because in 2013, no one should struggle to feed their children or go to bed hungry.

Learn more about how USAID is working to reduce hunger and malnutrition through Food for Peace

USAID in the News

The Guardian reported that USAID and the Department for International Development (DfID) in the UK will be joining forces in Mozambique to fight against trachoma, a disease that is the world’s leading cause of preventable blindness. The first crucial step the organizations will undertake is mapping the areas to determine where people are at risk of blindness from the disease, which will help identify where prevention measures, distribution of medicine, and surgery are most needed. The goal of the program, set forth in a World Health Assembly resolution in 1998, is to eliminate blindness caused by trachoma by 2020.

GMA News Online of the Philippines highlighted USAID relief funding and assistance for victims of the 7.2 magnitude earthquake that affected the Central Visayas region early this week. Simultaneously, hygiene kits will be made available to earthquake victims through USAID’s VisayasHealth Project.

AllAfrica reported that USAID will invest $25 million on orphans and vulnerable children in Nigeria. The project, which seeks to improve the wellbeing of 500,000 vulnerable children and 125,000 caregivers, will target local governments and strengthen the organizational systems and technical capacity of the Ministries of Women Affairs and Social Development.

Science Daily detailed the results of a USAID-supported study that examined the safety, efficacy, and acceptability of a one-year contraceptive vaginal ring (CVR). The results of the study, which demonstrated a positive response to the new contraceptive, indicated that the CVR could have a substantial impact as a resource for women in developing countries who lack convenient access to a health care facilities or reliable electricity. Currently, a wide range of obstacles prevent women in developing countries from accessing effective contraceptive methods.

Sun Star had an announcement that the city of Cagayan de Oro in Misamis Oriental province of the Philippines has been chosen by USAID as a pilot city for two-year development project. The project, called Investment Enabling Environment (INVEST), will seek to turn the city into an economic hub by streamlining business processes and improving investment planning and promotion. Government officials in Cagayan de Oro expect the project to boost local business and create employment opportunities in the city.

AllAfrica reported on a joint effort between USAID and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) that will increase rice production in Nigeria. The project, which will work to boost agriculture and ensure rural development, is part of an effort to boost economic activity. Farmers in Nigeria will be given access to tools and resources to increase their income and raise their standard of living.

Communities in Cote d’Ivoire Benefit from USAID’s Investments

USAID is helping communities in rural Cote d’Ivoire develop economic resiliency. Through our partners SAVE the Children and AVSI, we are supporting several types of economic strengthening activities, all of which increase the productive resources available for families. Through this work, we target the families and caregivers of children orphaned or made vulnerable by HIV/AIDS.

As they gathered for their savings group meeting, group members met us with a traditional welcome. Andrea Halverson. Photo credit: Andrea Halverson, USAID

As they gathered for their savings group meeting, group members met us with a traditional welcome. Photo credit: Andrea Halverson, USAID

In the mountainous, western city of Man, near Cote d’Ivoire’s border with Liberia, we met women gathering for their regular community savings group meeting. This region was one of the hardest hit during Cote d’Ivoire’s civil unrest. With poverty rates increasing over the past decade, savings groups combat a common problem in developing countries: lack of access to credit. Through these self-selected groups, members (usually all-women) will share a small portion of their money at each bi-monthly meeting, and are eligible to take loans, with interest, from this shared pool. At the end of the group sharing cycle, the amount saved is paid out to the group members. The additional money is making a difference in their lives and the lives of their children. Almost every woman uses her savings for school fees and school uniforms for her children.

Children watch as the community members cook the Attiéké, the final step in its production. Photo credit: Andrea Halverson, USAID

Children watch as the community members cook the Attiéké, the final step in its production. Photo credit: Andrea Halverson, USAID

In addition to savings groups, we also visited a community who had received start-up capital to fund a small business activity, producing a local delicacy called attiéké. Similar to couscous, attiéké is a fermented Ivoiran side dish, highly sought after in the region. Through the donation of a mill and a creative cassava partnership, the women had what they needed to start their small business. They are now making and selling attiéké. With pride, women told us of their informal distribution channels that stretched all the way to Mali. These and other investments are helping shape the future of Cote d’Ivoire, and reducing the vulnerability of Ivorian children by using profits to ensure they can enroll in school.

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