USAID Impact Photo Credit: USAID and Partners

Archives for Global Health

USAID and Merck Put Skin in the Health Finance Game

This originally appeared on the Devex Blog.

The U.S. Agency for International Development and pharmaceutical giant Merck have joined other donors and companies in a massive ramp-up of an existing public health financing program built to help countries that need health supplies get more bang for their buck.

The Pledge Guarantee for Health (PGH), a loan insurance program for health commodities, is emerging from a pilot phase, which supporters say showed that the program can work to get health supplies where they are needed most, faster and in larger quantities.

Early on, the PGH showed promise when it helped UNICEF deliver bed nets to Zambia months faster than usual, staving off a feared malaria outbreak during the rainy season.

USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah. Photo by: Center for Strategic and International Studies/CC BY-NC-SA

USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah announced on Thursday that the agency and the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency will commit $50 million to insure 50 percent of any loan that commercial banks issue to PGH over the next five years. The guarantee doubles the amount of funding that PGH can leverage from $50 to $100 million and signals a strong vote of confidence in the two-year-old program.

Merck and the public health product developer Vestergaard-Frandsen also pledged to provide discounted health products purchased through PGH, so the loans will carry even more weight in the health commodities market.

The companies will lower pricing so that the average savings on health commodities will offset the average costs of financing the loans to purchase them.

“This announcement builds on our efforts to partner with the private sector to help end preventable child death within a generation,” Shah said in a statement.

He added: “USAID’s partnership with PGH will help make this promise a reality by ensuring that people around the world — especially mothers and their children — have access to life-saving vaccines, bed nets, and other supplies that are delivered more quickly, cheaply, and broadly than ever before.”

‘Major leap forward’ for PGH

The pledge was first assembled two years ago by the United Nations Foundation and partners including the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and USAID.

In this next phase, UNF will continue to support the program, but will no longer have a financial stake in any loan guarantees.

PGH allows third-party guarantors to guarantee rapid bank loans so that recipient countries, or the NGOs that they select, can purchase and distribute antibiotics, vaccines, contraceptives, bed nets and other life-saving treatments six-to-eight months faster than if they did so through traditional donor funding channels. This fast-track process aims to address the problems of stock shortages and higher costs associated with slower supply deliveries.

With the new commitments from USAID and Merck, the pledge is poised to take a major leap forward, supporters say.

“By joining in this partnership with PGH, our company will help to provide developing countries and local health workers with improved faster access to our life-saving medicines and vaccines,” Merck President for Global Human Health Adam Schechter said in the joint statement with the USAID chief.

Schechter echoed Shah’s call for more public-private partnerships to jump-start the final push towards lagging Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). According to USAID public health officials, ending preventable child death is one goal where innovative financing and risk-sharing between government agencies and the private sector can remove road blocks and save lives.

“While the financial mechanisms may be complex, the goal of PGH is simple: to quickly and effectively reduce deaths from easily preventable diseases,” noted UNF President & CEO Kathy Calvin.

With more partners sharing more risk than ever before, there will be no shortage of scrutiny as to whether or not the pledge pays off.

Happy Baby, Happy Mama: Private Sector Partnership Gets Results with Vouchers

During the month of May, IMPACT will be highlighting USAID’s work in Global Health. Below features the important role of mothers and partnerships in Global Health.

When Scovia Ketusiime was 24 years old and five months pregnant with her second child she made a purchase that might have saved her life, the life of her baby, and that of her 18-month-old: she bought a voucher. The voucher cost $1.20 and entitled her to four antenatal care visits, a safe delivery including transport to a larger facility if needed, and a postnatal care visit.

Scovia lives in an area of Uganda with one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the country. While 88 percent of wealthy women have a skilled attendant at delivery, fewer than half of poor pregnant women deliver in the presence of a skilled attendant. To achieve the goal of reduced maternal mortality, Millennium Development Goal 5 (MDG 5), we need to increase the proportion of women who deliver with skilled attendants, and ultimately, we want every woman to deliver with a skilled provider. A critical step toward achieving this goal is partnership with the private sector.

Scovia Ketusiime holds a Healthy Baby voucher. Photo credit: SHOPS

When Scovia heard about the Healthy Baby voucher on the radio, she wasn’t thinking MDGs or partnerships. She was thinking safe delivery. Her first baby was born at home with the aid of a traditional birth attendant after three antenatal care visits at a local public facility. While her first delivery experience wasn’t bad, this time she wanted to ensure that, “in case of any complications, I can get good care.” She talked it over with her husband, and decided to buy a voucher. Happy with her decision, Scovia said that the price was affordable and that even if it had cost twice as much, she would have found a way to purchase a voucher.

The Healthy Baby voucher program is implemented by the USAID-funded Strengthening Health Outcomes through the Private Sector project in partnership with Marie Stopes Uganda. The program, supported by the Saving Mothers, Giving Life initiative, works with private facilities to ensure high quality service and with community-based voucher distributors to provide information to recipients.

The Healthy Baby voucher program set out to address the dual objective of increasing access to comprehensive obstetric care for the poor in private facilities and improving and maintaining the quality of obstetric care within the private sector. It achieved remarkable results.

Nine months after the program began, more than 10,000 vouchers had been sold. Almost 6,000 babies have been delivered to women using the vouchers to access safe delivery with a skilled birth attendant in a facility. More than 2,000 women used the vouchers for postnatal care, which included family planning counseling.

We know that when a mother dies, her children are less likely to survive. We know that two-thirds of all maternal deaths take place during the 24-hour period of labor and delivery. We know that poorer women lack access to quality obstetric care, and we know the private sector can help bridge the gap. This program shows that coupling private sector providers with low-cost vouchers can contribute to improved maternal health.

The program sounded good to Scovia. It sounded good to her husband, too. He is the one who takes her to the Kagame Maternity Home on his motorbike.

Follow USAID for Global Health (@USAIDGH) on Twitter and use #GHMatters to join in the conversation.

Saving Lives of Mothers and Babies through Family Planning

During the month of May, IMPACT will be highlighting USAID’s work in Global Health. From May 11-17, we will be featuring the important role of mothers and partnerships in Global Health.

With memories of Mother’s Day in the U.S. this past weekend still fresh in the mind—family gatherings, celebrations, festive meals, presents, flowers, and more—attention turns to the estimated 287,000 maternal deaths that occur each year, mostly in developing countries.

During this week, USAID is focusing on mothers and on how maternal health is critical to achieving its global health goals. Partnerships between the private sector and NGOs, foundations, associations, and others have allowed USAID to maximize its health impact around the world.

The death of a mother profoundly affects the health and well-being of her children. When a mother dies, her children are less likely to survive. If a mother dies in childbirth, her child is 10 times more likely to die before reaching age one.

A mother and her child in India. Photo credit: USAID

While maternal mortality remains unacceptably high throughout the developing world, a number of USAID-assisted countries have achieved significant reductions in maternal deaths from pregnancy-related causes. For example, several countries have already achieved Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 5 (PDF)—reducing maternal mortality by three-quarters between 1990 and 2015—including the following countries in which USAID works:

  • Romania (achieved an 84% reduction, from 170 to 27 maternal deaths per 100,000 live birth)
  • Equitorial Guinea (81% reduction, from 1,200 to 240 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births)
  • Nepal (78% reduction, from 770 to 170 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births)
  • Vietnam (76% reduction, from 240 to 59 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births)

Several countries are also on track to achieving MDG 5, including Bangladesh (with a 5.9% average annual decline in maternal mortality) and Egypt (6% annual decline).

Nevertheless, even with the global decline of maternal mortality by 47% since 1990, the level is far short of the 2015 target and developing regions still have maternal mortality rates 15 times higher than developed regions.

During the 24 hours of Mother’s Day, some 720 women—one every two minutes—died in pregnancy or childbirth—and about 8,000 newborn babies died. The 24-hour period of labor and delivery and the first day of life for babies, in particular, is the most dangerous time period for mothers and babies. Most maternal and newborn deaths during this time period could be prevented, however, with critical, lifesaving interventions, including:

  • Strengthening the capabilities and number of skilled birth attendants
  • Promoting access to and use of low-cost products, such as applying chlorhexidine (a common antiseptic) to the umbilical cord stumps of newborns—which has the potential to prevent 500,000 global neonatal deaths each year
  • Meeting unmet need for family planning could prevent more than 100,000 maternal deaths annually by giving couples the ability to decide when and how many children to have. Expanding access to family planning will help women bear children at the healthiest times so that mother and child are more likely to survive and stay healthy.

USAID programs work to ensure women have access to a wide range of voluntary family planning methods ranging from CycleBeads® (a natural family planning method) to oral contraceptives and other short term as well as long-acting methods, from which a woman can choose. Expanding access to long-acting reversible contraceptives and permanent methods (LARCs and PMs) is particularly important. An article published in the Global Health: Science and Practice Journal (co-published by USAID and the K4Health Project at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Center for Communication Programs) explains that if 1 of 5 women in sub-Saharan Africa who were currently using pills or injectables switched to contraceptive implants, more than 1.8 million unintended pregnancies would be averted in 5 years, resulting in 10,000 fewer maternal deaths. Although use of implants worldwide remains low, they are increasingly popular and in high demand when they are actually available in family planning programs.

Not surprisingly, many programs are focusing on increasing access to family planning in countries with low contraceptive prevalence, such as in Africa where modern method use is at 23%. But family planning programs in countries with relatively high contraceptive prevalence also could have the potential for improvement. For example, women in Indonesia have, on average, 2.6 children, and modern method use is at 58%. However, contraceptive prevalence has been stagnant since the 1990s and the method mix is skewed toward short-acting methods, even though Indonesian couples are more likely to want to limit births. Nearly 8 in 10 modern method users rely on injectables and pills. Meanwhile, use of IUDs has dropped dramatically over the years, from 13% in the early 1990s to only 4% today, and use of implants and sterilization is at about 3% each.

The K4Health Project is implementing the Improving Contraceptive Method Mix (ICMM) Project to better understand the situation on the ground. Why has use of certain long-acting methods, such as IUDs, dropped over time? Do women know about LAPMs? Are they interested in using these methods?

This information will help inform the design of an integrated advocacy and knowledge management intervention—informed by Advance Family Planning-Indonesia’s advocacy methodology—in 6 districts in East Java and West Nusatenggara. ICMM will support the availability of a broader range of contraceptive methods for women and couples, with the ultimate goal of improving maternal health in Indonesia. The innovative project, funded jointly by USAID and AusAID and implemented by K4Health in collaboration with the Cipta Cara Padu Foundation, the Center for Health Research at the University of Indonesia (CHR-UI), the Indonesia Ministry of Health, and the National Population and Family Planning Board (BKKBN), is a unique partnership that leverages valuable resources and complementary skills and capabilities of various stakeholders.

With knowledge partnerships such as these and others designed to save mothers and babies through family planning, combined with improved services for pregnant women, perhaps Mother’s Day celebrated in the U.S. will one day become an international celebration event for women all around the world, if not in name, then at least in practice.

Follow USAID for Global Health (@USAIDGH) on Twitter and use #GHMatters to join in the conversation.

Join My Village Lift Women and Girls out of Poverty

During the month of May, IMPACT will be highlighting USAID’s work in Global Health. From May 11-17, we will be featuring the important role of mothers and partnerships in Global Health.

In the last 23 years, global mortality rates have decreased by 47 percent. With funding from international governments and non-governmental organizations, developing countries across the globe have received unprecedented aid in the form of education and healthcare support to decrease mortality rates.

Join My Village (JMV), a program of CARE in partnership with General Mills and Merck, is working to resolve this issue by building awareness online and providing on-the-ground programming that includes support groups for men and women as well as community engagements to reduce misconceptions about pregnancy and maternal health. JMV helps to lift women and girls out of poverty through education while also providing sustainable improvement in maternal and newborn health through effective service delivery and women’s empowerment initiatives. The programs are having a remarkable impact on communities in India by changing the behavior and attitude of whole communities around the treatment of women.

Preventing maternal deaths not only saves women’s lives, it can positively impact families and whole communities. Photo credit: PATH/Evelyn Hockstein

Along with working to uplift women, JMV is has also made a point to engage men in these communities. Men have a larger say in decisions that ultimately affect women’s economic, educational and reproductive health. To ensure that the women have a conducive and supportive environment at home, their husbands are invited to participate in the interactive meetings.

Recently, we heard from a young husband and wife participating in the JMV program in Uttar Pradesh, India. After going through a difficult first pregnancy where the mother did not receive prenatal care, the young woman almost lost her life and her baby. Of the second pregnancy, her husband said, “Though that incident taught me the risks involved in home deliveries, today’s meeting taught me how to be better prepared even before the child arrives. My wife stopped taking her iron tablets as she said they made her nauseous. I didn’t bother much about it until I came here today and learned how important they are for both the child and my wife. Now I will ensure she takes them at the appropriate time to avoid uneasiness. Planning for the future is another critical thing I learned, and I will start saving for the child right away.” The couple, happy to have attended the meeting, feel that they are now better equipped for the birth of their second child.

Preventing maternal deaths not only saves women’s lives, it can positively impact families and whole communities. When a mother dies, her family oftentimes breaks apart and her children are less likely to go to school, receive immunizations against diseases and eat nutritionally sound diets. By equipping women and their partners with lifesaving information, women will bear children at the healthiest times so that mother and child are more likely to survive and stay healthy.

Through these outreach programs, JMV encourages communities to be supportive of the health, education and empowerment of women and girls. To learn more about Join My Village and its partners please visit www.joinmyvillage.com.

Akanksha Nigam is a Media Officer for Join My Village, a program of CARE.

Follow USAID for Global Health (@USAIDGH) on Twitter and use #GHMatters to join in the conversation.

Partnerships Put “Action” into the Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control Pneumonia and Diarrhoea

During the month of May, IMPACT will be highlighting USAID’s work in Global Health. From May 11-17, we will be featuring the important role of mothers and partnerships in Global Health.

The global health sector sounds vast – after all, it has the word “global” in it – when in reality, it is a relatively small number of people with a noble mission that requires a ton of work. None of us can do it alone. As a result, government and nonprofit groups of all shapes and sizes emphasize the importance of partnership.

But what does partnership really mean? Like advocacy, integration, and other important yet nebulous buzz words of international development, it is best illustrated by example. For us, one of the most exciting partnership activities was the recent global NGO response to the Integrated Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Pneumonia and Diarrhoea (GAPPD).

As the first-ever action plan to simultaneously tackle the two leading killer diseases of children less than five years old, the plan itself is a blueprint for practical partnership in action (or, to use another one of our favorite words, for integration). After all, child health does not exist in a vacuum; while there are distinct solutions for each illness, there are also overlapping protective interventions, so it makes sense for our community to tackle pneumonia and diarrhea at the same time.

More than 100 NGOs with diverse focus areas and geographies supported this integrated approach by signing onto a community statement and more than 40 global leaders and experts in the field lent their voices to the effort. Partners rallied around the #MindTheGAPPD conversation to make it a success on social media (a special shout out to @USAIDGH, the top user of the hashtag!). Each group’s focus area – WASH, vaccines, indoor air pollution, etc. – brought unique perspectives to the larger conversation without taking away from any one group’s mission. By putting it into the larger context, it strengthened our messages on a scale impossible to achieve on our own and brought the global health sector one step closer toward a common goal: to ensure that every child gets to celebrate a fifth birthday.

For the Global Action Plan to truly be actionable, partnership efforts must cascade to the local level. That’s why PATH and World Vision developed a toolkit to enhance the efforts of our colleagues advocating for change at the national, subnational, and community levels. From conception to implementation, partnerships are taking the movement forward.

Will you join us?

Follow USAID for Global Health (@USAIDGH) on Twitter and use #GHMatters  and #MindTheGAPPD to join in the conversation.

Photo of the Week: Celebrating Mothers Everywhere

During the month of May, we have been highlighting USAID’s work in Global Health. Global health plays a critical role in ending extreme poverty — with a particular focus on ending preventable child and maternal deaths, and creating an AIDS-free generation. The first part of the month, from May 1-10, we focused on the role that science, technology and innovation plays in global health. In celebration of mothers everywhere, we will be featuring the important role of mothers and partnerships in Global Health during May 11-17. Future highlights include AIDS-Free Generation (May 18-27), Family Planning (May 27-June 2), Nutrition (June 3-8). Photo is from PATH/Satvir Malhotra.

Follow USAID for Global Health (@USAIDGH) on Twitter and use #GHMatters to join in the conversation.

From Haiti to Kenya – Honoring the Wisdom & Contributions of Moms

During the month of May, IMPACT will be highlighting USAID’s work in Global Health. From May 11-17, we will be featuring the important role of mothers and partnerships in Global Health.

While visiting Haiti last month, I met with a group of farmers to discuss how they were using micro-loans from a local cooperative association. During the conversation, a woman mango grower spoke about using credit to pay her kids’ school fees prior to harvest and then using profits from the sale of her fruit to pay off the loan. It reminded me of a conversation with Maasai women during a trip to Kenya where they recounted the use of proceeds from their cattle fattening business to pay school fees for kids in their community. Both exchanges brought to life the critical role that mothers—and women generally—play in promoting development around the world.

A woman and her baby. Photo Credit: Adriane Ohanesian

Mother’s Day provides a special opportunity for us to reflect on the role moms play in our lives and in the lives of people around the world. In the home, mothers are often the primary caregivers. They are important in ensuring that children receive the food, health care and education needed to grow into healthy, productive adults. They are educators, teaching children skills that will last a lifetime. The American Sociology Association estimates that moms spend 10 more hours a week multitasking than fathers, mainly doing housework and taking care of kids. At the same time, they are often also generating income for the family. That income is critical to kids’ well-being because girls and women have been found to spend 90 percent of their earned income on their families, while men only spend between 30-40 percent that way. Given their multiple, critical roles, we need to think about how we can support moms and leverage their contributions. Invest in mothers and we can grow economies, alleviate poverty and create the foundation for sustainable growth and development.

In the past twenty years, mothers have been instrumental in helping reduce the mortality rate for children under five years old by almost fifty percent. Unfortunately, today, every two minutes, a mother dies during childbirth. A staggering 80 percent of those deaths could be prevented by providing access to basic health services. Similarly, almost 19,000 children under five still die daily from preventable causes. Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia bear 75 percent of the global disease burden, and mothers and children continue to suffer disproportionately from these illnesses borne of poverty. USAID is working hard, in partnership with country governments and non-governmental organizations globally, to reduce these preventable deaths.

Through continuous improvements to monitoring and evaluation, we are  directing resources toward increasing services for underserved populations; concentrating on the primary causes of child deaths in the hardest hit countries.  We are being strategic with taxpayer dollars by investing in programs that yield the greatest results. Our development efforts are increasingly focused on educating girls, empowering women, and promoting inclusive economic growth. That’s because we know that educated mothers are less likely to die in childbirth, more likely to send their kids to school, and provide better nutrition and health care at home. In fact, data suggests that each additional year of schooling reduces the likelihood that a mother’s child will die as an infant by 10 percent.

At USAID, we are supporting mothers worldwide. Since June 2012, the agency has been helping lead the U.S. Government’s push to renew the global effort to end preventable child death. We are committed to utilizing resources, technology, and expertise to achieve the A Promise Renewed for Child Survival goal of reducing the under five-mortality rate to below 20 deaths per 1000 live births by the year 2035. Reaching this target is a team effort by governments, civil society, the private sector, innovators, and the global health and faith-based community. Workings together, the international community can help ensure a promising future for all women and their children.

We know the statistics and we know what we need to do. We know that investing in mothers pays dividends for children, families, communities and nations. The data is clear but it’s the stories from the women in Haiti, Kenya, and around the world that bring those numbers to life. This Mother’s Day, let’s honor their wisdom and their contributions.

Follow USAID for Global Health (@USAIDGH) on Twitter and use #GHMatters to join in the conversation.

 

Malian Midwife Champions Respectful Care for Pregnant Women and their Families

During the month of May, IMPACT will be highlighting USAID’s work in Global Health. From May 11-17, we will be featuring the important role of mothers and partnerships in Global Health.

The man brings his pregnant wife into the health center and is confronted by the irritated midwife who raises her voice: “I’m too busy, what do you want? Go outside, this is no place for a man!” Later, the man returns for news about his wife’s condition and is promptly told to “go back and sit there.”

This role play session about abuse and disrespect in maternity care was part of a training in Burkina Faso sponsored by MCHIP. Through role play, MCHIP trainers demonstrated to doctors and midwives what not to do when attending to their patients, as disrespectful treatment of pregnant women and their families is all too common in health facilities around the world. This is especially true in developing countries, where doctors and midwives often lack basic infrastructure, supplies, manpower, or even awareness about patients’ rights to be treated with dignity during birth.

Pregnant woman with companion at the renovated maternity ward in Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso. Photo credit: USAID

Training participant Haoua Ba had never heard about respectful care until this MCHIP training, even after 22 years as a midwife in Mali. Haoua and about 30 other midwives, pediatricians and obstetricians are known as Africa “Champions” (or advocates) for improving maternal and newborn health by promoting up-to-date knowledge, practices and attitudes in their countries and region. Mali is one of 10 key African countries—along with Benin, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Senegal, South Sudan, Uganda and Zambia—where the MCHIP Africa Champions Program is being implemented over two years (2011-2013).

MCHIP maternal and newborn health trainings have always emphasized “women friendly care,” for example by introducing skills checklists with which providers are evaluated on their ability to provide respectful care. However, given the prevalence of disrespect and abuse—in Africa in particular—and the lack of knowledge about this issue, Africa Champion trainers developed an entire training module devoted to this topic. In this 1.5 hour session, a facilitator helps training participants understand during group discussion that there is evidence that key components of respectful care, such as involving a woman in her care, will make the birth experience go more smoothly for both the woman and the health care provider.

Haoua described how this training session taught her to respect pregnant women and their families by greeting them politely and continually informing them in a soothing voice about everything she is doing. And since the training last year, Haoua has seen a big difference after putting into practice these new skills.

“When you show respect, it really facilitates things,” she said. “If you calmly tell the woman what to do and explain things her, it comforts her. And word gets around so women know who is going to treat them well and they request that midwife when they come into the hospital.”

After participating in three Africa Champions maternal and newborn health trainings on innovative, lifesaving practices, Haoua is uniquely positioned to transfer these lessons learned. She plans to do so with both staff and student interns at the busy Referral Health Center in Bamako, Mali, where she also works as a midwife with 22 other midwives and three gynecologists. In fact, one of her primary goals as a Champion is to help strengthen the health center team by promoting evidence-based care. She described how she and one of the doctors will organize trainings about twice a month on a particular theme and have attendees practice on mannequins under their supervision to ensure they are correctly using their newly acquired skills and knowledge.

Importantly, Haoua has taught her colleagues that a woman should be allowed to have a companion by her side during the birth, which is a central tenant of respectful care. Having a loved one present provides women with essential comfort and support during the birth process, especially when the health center staff are busy or overworked. Evidence supports this practice as one that can help to shorten labor and increase normal outcomes.

A pregnant woman who must give birth without the company of a loved one or who must lie on the floor because there are not enough tables, without the privacy of a curtain, is not receiving respectful care. But even in the worst conditions, said Haoua, “if you have the will to do things well, you can help women.”

She is a perfect example of how the USAID-funded Africa Champions program is helping to prevent the untold suffering of women during one of the most vulnerable but extraordinary times in their lives.

Follow USAID for Global Health (@USAIDGH) on Twitter and use #GHMatters to join in the conversation.

Saving & Empowering Lives through Clean Cooking Innovation

During the month of May, IMPACT will be highlighting USAID’s work in Global Health.

A major study published in December cited high blood pressure, alcohol, and tobacco as the top three health risks in the world. Could you guess the fourth? You probably did it last night.

The seemingly simple act of cooking a meal is responsible for 4 million deaths each year.

That’s because nearly 3 billion people burn solid fuels such as wood, charcoal, coal, and other fuels to cook every day. When burned in open fires and basic stoves, solid fuels emit a harmful smoke that causes a range of cancers, heart and lung diseases, developmental and neurological impacts, cataracts, and more.

Example of a pine needle powered cook stove. Photo credit: USAID

Inefficient and dangerous cooking practices are also a major cause of burns, and the acts of collecting and burning fuelwood lead to deforestation and the release of climate-changing gases, respectively.

Women and children have the primary responsibility for cooking and fuel collection in developing countries, and are therefore most at risk from the side effects: smoke inhalation, crippling burns, time lost for schooling or work, human or animal attacks during fuel collection, and myriad others.

But, you’re probably asking, how can technological innovation change such a seemingly intractable and global challenge? Enter the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves.

Launched by then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton in 2010 with 19 founding partners under the leadership of the UN Foundation, today, the Alliance is comprised of more than 650 partners across 6 continents. They’ve joined the Alliance to save lives, improve livelihoods, empower women, and protect the environment by creating a market for clean, safe, efficient, and affordable cooking solutions. Our goal is for 100 million households to adopt clean cookstoves and fuels by the year 2020.

With our partners, including founding partner USAID, we are taking an all-of-the-above approach to ensure that as hundreds of millions of people enter the global middle class, they no longer cook as their ancestors have done since the beginning of human history:

  • Research: We are commissioning research with cookstove and fuel interventions that will help us better understand how to achieve the cleanliness and efficiency markers essential to save and improve lives and the environment, and to underscore once and for all that this is a major global development challenge that deserves awareness and funding on par with similar crises.
  • Standards: International standards to define cookstove cleanliness, safety, and efficiency had never existed until the Alliance and the Partnership for Clean Indoor Air began working with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). The interim system that has been adopted is now in the process of being translated into permanent standards. A tiered system through the ISO will create global norms and strengthen a market for clean cooking solutions.
  • Testing centers: To carry out those standards and further propel local manufacturing and testing, the Alliance is supporting the enhancement or creation of testing centers in 12 countries worldwide. Previously, most stoves had to be sent to North America or Europe to be tested, proving very costly for manufacturers and impeding local growth of markets.
  • SPARK and Pilot Innovation Funds: The SPARK and the Pilot Innovation Funds are part of our plan to increase the level of resources, grants, and investment in the clean cooking sector. Each year, we will support entrepreneurs and innovation through at least $2.25 million. This year’s Pilot awardees were recently announced, and we look forward to announcing the SPARK recipients later this month.
  • Input from consumers: Each of the above steps will be fruitless if we aren’t engaged in dialogue with consumers at each step along the value chain: food taste; cooking style; stove design, weight and color; manufacturing; distribution; purchasing; and adoption. The Alliance and its partners have strong relationships with community associations, women’s groups, and others to ensure we hear directly from consumers about their economic, health, and standard of living aspirations, and then translate that information into action.

The Alliance and its partners strongly believe that cooking shouldn’t kill, and because you are reading this blog during USAID’s Global Health Month+ series, I suspect that you do, too. Find out about all of our market-enabling activities and join us at www.cleancookstoves.org.

Follow USAID for Global Health (@USAIDGH) on Twitter and use #GHMatters to join in the conversation.

The Power of Mobile Technology to Save Lives

During the month of May, IMPACT will be highlighting USAID’s work in Global Health. From May 1-10, we will be featuring the role that Science, Technology & Innovation plays in Global Health.

The development field has been exploring for years ways to harness the power of technology to benefit those in need, especially mobile technology, which can reach people in remote areas who need food, health, education, and other assistance quickly and well.

A health worker refers to her mobile phone for information while making a house visit. Photo credit: World Vision

Health is an area in which the benefits of mobile technology are obvious. One initiative World Vision is especially proud of is our mobile health (mHealth) projects  in 13 countries. Our mHealth projects leverage the ubiquity of mobile phones to deliver information to, and receive information from, patients and caregivers and can address a broad range of scenarios, including announcements, targeted messages, appointment reminders, medical records for patients, treatment reminders, training and tools for front line health workers and volunteers. Key mHealth principles that have been integrated into current and planned projects include: 1. Align closely with Ministries of Health and their partners; 2. Work in partnership with other funders, developers, and implementers to build on and add to global learning; 3. Design to meet the needs of local users but also provide the basis for maturing the evidence base; 4. Be initially affordable yet based on sustainable costing models and scalable technology; 5. Be respectful of data governance issues; 6. Utilize and strengthen government and partner information systems; 7. Emphasize coherence and quality of approach and program/project management; and 8. Favor open source solutions and emerging global standards.

To support mHealth, World Vision has strategically partnered with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Grameen Foundation, and Dimagi to create and deploy a World Vision version of the Gates-funded MOTECH Suite (MTS), a sustainable, scalable, open source mobile solution. MTS provides a set of capabilities encompassing five key functional mHealth areas: Behavior Change & Demand Generation, Managing Patient Data, Improving Worker Performance, Last-Mile Supply Chain, and Patient Adherence. This partnership allows World Vision’s funded mHealth projects to utilize a common, yet customizable, field-tested mHealth tool.

MTS was piloted in World Vision’s Afghanistan mHealth project (USAID-funded Child Survival Health program 2008-2013), and the evaluation results are encouraging:

  • significant improvement between intervention and control groups in any antenatal attendance (20 percent),
  • skilled delivery at a health facility (22.3 percent),
  • having a birth plan that included improved coordination with the health facility (12.6 percent),
  • saved money and arranged transport (12.9 percent)
  • knowledge of two or more pregnancy danger signs (12.9 percent).

A volunteer health worker refers to her mobile phone for information while making a house visit. Photo credit: World Vision

In World Vision’s Mozambique mHealth project (Gates-funded Grand Challenges 2010-2012), MTS research results indicated that pregnant women in the project’s intervention area had a higher likelihood of accessing antenatal care, prepare better for birth, and have their births assisted by a skilled provider. They were also more likely than those in the control group to know about signs of pregnancy complications and to seek care at a facility for that complication.

The advantages of the shared framework of MTS are numerous, from minimizing software development, operations, and support costs, to making available the source code, best practices, learning, and other assets to the global community to avoid duplication, and ultimately, save more lives. As World Vision rolls out MTS in additional countries and regions, we’ll analyze the complexity and economics of this versus other models, the interface with national Ministries of Health systems, impact, and sustainability.

Deployments of WV’s global version of MTS have begun in Sierra Leone, Uganda, and Zambia, with others to follow in Tanzania, Sri Lanka and India by this August. World Vision aims to increase geographical mHealth reach within these countries while enhancing MTS functionality at the community level. The focus is on creation of a solution that is globally deployable, meeting at least 80 percent of functionality needs for each project, and further customizable for each context. A key characteristic of this effort is collaboration with Ministries of Health and intentional efforts to forge public-private partnership agreements with mobile network operators and other potential private sector partners. This model has already effected notable reductions in duplication of effort and overall costs at the global level, as well as for each project.

Initiatives like MTS are the way forward for NGOs to impact the global health field, including reducing incidence of malaria, improving maternal and child health, and improving child nutrition. Read more about World Vision’s mHealth projects.

Follow USAID for Global Health (@USAIDGH) on Twitter and use #GHMatters to join in the conversation.

Page 17 of 47:« First« 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 »Last »