USAID Impact Photo Credit: USAID and Partners

Archives for USAID

USAID launches Feed the Future Website

USAID, on behalf of the U.S. Government, is proud to launch the Feed the Future website.

“We are all impatient because we are acutely aware that today the lack of adequate food will result in the premature deaths of about 25,000 people,” Dr. Shah said during a speech today where he outlined the U.S Government’s new architecture for food security.  “We can Feed the Future, but we have not one more moment to waste.”

Feed the Future is the Obama Administration’s global hunger and food security initiative. The website includes the Feed the Future Guide, an implementation strategy for the initiative officially released today.

Please find more information here.

THREE QUESTIONS for Ambassador William Garvelink

Ambassador William Garvelink recently joined USAID as Deputy Coordinator for Development for the Feed the Future initiative.

Q.              What is Feed the Future?

Garvelink:   Feed the Future is the U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative.      Through Feed the Future, we will contribute to raising incomes, improving nutrition, and enhancing food security – seeking to impact millions of lives worldwide.

Q.              Why the emphasis on food security — why now?

Garvelink:    Right now, we have a historic opportunity.  Global leaders at the 2009 G8 Summit made a commitment to act with scale and urgency.  President Obama’s $3.5 billion pledge helped to leverage more than $18.5 billion from other donors in support of a common approach to achieve sustainable food

Read the rest of this entry »

Pic of the Week – Healthy Moms and Babies in Kenya

Improving Mothers and Infants Health

USAID is supporting health training of mothers in Kenya. The programs encourage women to consider delivering their children in a hospital, rather than at home. Women who deliver at home face greater risk of complications and infections, and their babies are less likely to be fully vaccinated. In areas where USAID programs are in place, hospital deliveries have nearly doubled.

Today is HIV Vaccine Awareness Day

Young people are watching a play about adults being encouraged to get tested for HIV as part of participating in a clinical trial for a novel HIV vaccine at YRG Care, a premiere HIV referral center in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

Administrator Shah recently said that “humanity demands an AIDS vaccine” when describing USAID’s approach to high impact development.  USAID and its partners continue to support the quest for a safe vaccine that could effectively prevent HIV — a search that is commemorated each year on May 18th, HIV Vaccine Awareness Day.  This work is essential since notable progress in providing life-saving treatment to those who need it cannot keep up with the number of new HIV infections.  For every two people living with HIV who begin taking antiretroviral therapy, five additional people become newly infected.  Each day, there are at least 7,400 new infections.

Our current efforts are outlined in a vaccine brief.

USAID’s Senior Technical Advisor for HIV Vaccines was featured in a recent issue of Frontlines [PDF].

Aiding Agriculture after Conflict

USAID Administrator & Sudanese Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry launch FARM

USAID and the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry launched the FARM program, which marshals a variety of resources in a re-emerging agricultural area. It's designed to inspire others to join as partners in reducing hunger in southern Sudan.

Today we launched the Food, Agribusiness, and Rural Markets (FARM) Program, an innovative and promising partnership with the Government of South Sudan to rebuild capacity in the “green belt zone,” where conflict destroyed much local agricultural production during Sudan’s civil war.  This area has high potential and, with new road construction, will be connected to fast-growing markets for farm goods.

Read more about the FARM program here.

From the Dust of Darfur to the Green Shoots of Democracy

Welcome to my debut in the brave new world of blogging at USAID.

We’ve made the most of our time during Dr. Shah’s first Africa trip as the head of this amazing agency; only in the home stretch have I found a few minutes to share an observation or two.

With impressions still intense from a day and a night in Darfur – most notably, visiting under a scorching sun a vast and desert-dusty camp for internally displaced people that thousands of victims of violence, mostly women and children, now know as home – we rose at dawn to head to Juba in the far south of Sudan.  Here the climate is different in every sense.

Right off the bat we met with our civil society partners in the effort to improve governance and confidence in democracy.  The Sudanese Group for Democratic Elections and the Sudanese Network for Democratic Elections provide voter education and poll-watching in the country’s north and south, respectively.  They face very different political situations but similar challenges in trying to protect the integrity of the electoral process.  USAID facilitates this grassroots work with technical guidance and

Read the rest of this entry »

Health and Development in Southern Sudan

This afternoon we visited two sites where USAID, together with community groups, is helping improve health in Juba.

Sudan is a top U.S. government foreign policy priority; we need this country to be on a stable, peaceful path, which in turn is crucial to regional security.  Ultimately this means transitioning from humanitarian assistance to long-term development.

At more than $1 billion per year, USAID’s program in Sudan is our largest in sub-Saharan Africa.  One important project is the Lolongo Clinic in an outlying area of Juba, which helps meet the community’s basic health needs while also educating parents in preventative care.  About 35,000 people in the region rely on the treatment and care that Lolongo offers; that works out to about $6 per person per year.

Non-governmental organizations such as this clinic account for a full 86 percent of all health care services in Sudan.  And it’s by far not enough.  Southern Sudan has the highest maternal mortality ratio in the world, and a girl stands a higher chance of dying in childbirth than completing secondary school.

Read the rest of this entry »

A Visit to Otash Camp

An early a.m. flight brought us to Juba in south Sudan. We swapped planes at the airport and headed straight for Nyala, the capital of South Darfur.

USAID Administrator Dr. Rajiv Shah at Otash Camp with the WFP.

USAID works in partnership with 11 other organizations to provide humanitarian assistance to the thousands living in the Otash IDP camp at near Nyala in Darfur.

After arriving, we met up with the World Food Programme (WFP) and visited an IDP camp called Otash.

USAID, through the WFP and its NGO partners like World Vision, provides emergency relief supplies to the 71,000 Dafuris living in Otash. The camp was established in 2004 and was originally home to 15,000 IDPs. It grew to its current size after large scale displacements in 2004 following fighting between the Government of Sudan and Darfuri rebels, and more recently, in 2008 after the outbreak of tribal conflict.

Since 2003, USAID has helped to meet the immediate needs of millions of people affected by the conflict in Darfur. Today, in the three states of Darfur there are some two million people living in IDP camps.

Read the rest of this entry »

Security and Livelihoods in Darfur

Just came from a series of meetings with our international partners in South Darfur.

We discussed a number of Darfur’s complex challenges with leaders from the World Food Programme, United Nations-African Union Mission in Darfur (UNAMID), the UN Population Fund and other UN agencies and humanitarian NGOs.

Security continues to be a serious challenge for humanitarian agencies trying to access vulnerable populations. And now there’s a disturbing trend of attacks and abductions of humanitarian staff. Two UNAMID peacekeepers were recently killed when their vehicle was ambushed outside of Nyala.

Insecurity is also preventing the millions of displaced Dafuris from returning home.

But in addition to the security concerns, many Darfuris are wondering what they have to go back to, especially the young people, who have largely grown up in these camps.

Read the rest of this entry »

A Hub for Girl Geeks

In yesterday’s meeting with technology entrepreneurs, we learned about a new innovation hub in Nairobi that’s serving as an incubation space for the local tech community.

Needless to say, we were intrigued. So today I decided to investigate and paid a visit to the iHub –a modern, open and light filled community workspace where programmers, tech entrepreneurs, investors

Read the rest of this entry »

Page 92 of 93:« First« 89 90 91 92 93 »