USAID Impact Photo Credit: USAID and Partners

Archives for Disaster Relief

This Week at USAID – July 12, 2010

Today is the six-month commemoration of the 7.0 earthquake that struck Haiti on January 12, 2010. Administrator Shah just returned from a trip to Haiti and issued a statement to mark the commemoration.

USAID is hosting a conference entitled Transforming Development through Science, Technology and Innovation.  The conference is co-hosted with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the President’s Science Advisor Dr. John Holdren.  Participants include many of the world’s leading scientists and development thinkers, along with leaders of key federal science agencies who will help map out USAID’s bold new science, technology and innovation agenda.

Statement from Administrator Shah on the Six Month Commemoration of the Haiti Earthquake

submitted by Anna Gohmann

Administrator Shah released the following statement on the six-month commemoration of the 7.0 earthquake that struck Haiti on January 12, 2010:

“Today, we pause to reflect on the tragedy that struck Haiti six months ago and claimed the lives of more than 230,000 people.  In the wake of the devastation, countless more were left injured and 1.5 million were displaced and moved into spontaneous settlements across greater Port-au-Prince.

In the immediate aftermath of the earthquake, USAID participated in the largest urban food distribution in history and fed more than 3.5 million people.  We helped distribute emergency shelter to 1 million people.  And we supported a campaign to vaccinate more than one million Haitians against diseases and outbreaks that could have decimated the population.

But our work has only just begun and significant challenges lay before Haiti and the international community.   The US has committed more than $1 billion to Haiti’s long-term reconstruction and development.  USAID is working with our colleagues at the Department of State and others across the Federal Government to apply the experience and knowledge of our development experts to high-impact projects in five key areas: agriculture, energy, governance support, infrastructure, and health.

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Supporting Medical and Psychological Care to Haitian Children in the Aftermath of the Earthquake

 

A young boy receives an oral polio vaccination at a USAID/OFDA-funded International Medical Corps clinic at Petionville golf club on July 13, 2010, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Photo by Kendra Helmer/USAID

Submitted by Sara Lockwood

We’d like to conclude our project spotlight series this week by highlighting the positive change that a USAID supported clinic run by the International Medical Corps has brought to one Haitian community. Our colleagues on the ground report that the clinic, located in Bolosse, is always filled with school children. The clinic was created almost immediately after the earthquake to serve the four spontaneous settlements that now surround it, and offers medical and psychosocial care targeted to children attending the recently reopened school next door.

Here’s what Patrick Paillant, the principal at the school near the clinic, has to say about the program:

I have identified eight children suffering from mental problems [as a result of the earthquake]. There could be more. Some of the children might be too young for these problems to fully manifest . . . This clinic is really good. Before [the earthquake], when a child had a problem, we would have to find the resources to take care of it. Now we don’t have to.

The grandmother of Francesca, a six-year old girl who has received care at the clinic, had this to add:

The clinic here has done a very good job. They are seeing many, many patients.

Clinics such as these are critically important in helping Haitian children process everything they’ve experienced and all that they’ve lost over the last six months. The care given at these clinics will go a very long way towards allowing these Haitian children to focus in school and continue believing in a better future for their country.

Rebuilding Haiti isn’t just about blueprints, bricks, and mortar. It’s about helping Haitians—large and small–to rebuild their own lives despite the incredible challenges that they face.

INVOLVING HAITIANS IN THE RECONSTRUCTION EFFORT THROUGH JOBS TRAINING

submitted by Sara Lockwood

As part of our continuing series spotlighting the human face of our work in Haiti, we’d like to return to a program that we’ve already discussed here at IMPACT—the CLEARS program, that is funded by USAID and executed by our partner CHF International.

Haiti's newest generation of heavy equipment operators.

Adrien Olguine, 25, is one of 40 graduates who have been trained in operating heavy machinery and equipment by CHF International as part of USAID’s OFDAfunded CLEARS program.

Before the earthquake, CHF saw that there was a serious shortage of heavy-equipment operators in Haiti and realized that there was a tremendous opportunity to give a group of Haitians a badly needed skill-set and a chance at a better future. CHF partnered with HayTrac and set to work training 40 Haitians in how to operate heavy machinery like back-hos, bulldozers, and other equipment that would be necessary for critical new construction projects in Haiti.

Once the earthquake struck Haiti, these needs became even more acute. Graduates from the CLEARS program sprang into action and put their new skills to use clearing collapsed buildings and rubble. Here’s what Adrien Olguine, 25, one of the 40 graduates said about her ability to meaningfully contribute to Haiti’s relief and reconstruction effort:

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THREE THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT THE U.S. GOVERNMENT’S WORK IN HAITI

submitted by Jayanthi Narain

Lighting Up Camps: The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) is funding an initial 75 solar lights for spontaneous settlements. USAID is working with the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and UNFPA to evaluate lighting needs in settlements and install lights where they’re needed. These solar lights will make Haiti’s displaced persons safer through a reliable and plentifully available source of energy.

Returning Homes to Habitability: As a model for future reconstruction efforts, USAID partner Pan American Development Foundation (PADF) is repairing houses damaged in the earthquake. PADF is producing a guide on training, cost analysis, and future house repairs based on this project for the Government of Haiti, and it will train builders and masons. Lessons learned from this project will be turned into post‐earthquake House Repair Guidelines specifically tailored to the Haitian context.

Reinforcing Houses: USAID has been working hand‐in‐hand with the United Nations Shelter Cluster to ensure that Haitians are prepared for the rainy season. Public outreach materials include posters in Haitian Creole such as this guide to reinforcing emergency housing.

For more information, email: usaidpressofficers@usaid.gov.

THREE THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT THE U.S. GOVERNMENT’S WORK IN HAITI

submitted by Anna Gohmann

Bringing Jobs Beyond Port-au-Prince: USAID food security partner ACDI/VOCA established 178 food-for-work teams comprising 21 persons each to undertake road repairs and soil conservation activities. As of June 15, the food-for-work teams had repaired 53 km of road in La Vallee municipality and 90 km of road in Cote de Fer municipality, both in Southeast Department. The beneficiaries are primarily displaced Haitians who reside with host families.

Clearing Earthquake Debris: USAID, the international community, and the Government of Haiti have moved at least 503,500 cubic meters of rubble between January and June of 2010.

Making Headway on Sanitation Goals:
As of June 16, Water, Sanitation, and Health (WASH) Cluster partners have constructed more than 11,000 toilets, 2,932 showers, provided 5 liters of water per person per day, established 450 private water kiosks; trained 3,238 hygiene promoters; and distributed 200,000 hygiene kits. USAID is one of the largest funders of WASH cluster efforts.

For more information  email: usaidpressofficers@usaid.gov.

USAID – Pic of the Week

Angelina Jolie visits USAID

Angelina Jolie visits USAID at the U.S. Embassy on June 19, 2010. Photo by: Kendra Helmer

Angelina Jolie, U.N.’s goodwill ambassador, talks with USAID/Haiti Mission Director Carleene Dei (in black vest) at the U.S. Embassy in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on June 19, 2010. Jolie spoke about child-protection issues with the State Department, USAID and USAID partner Pan American Development Foundation.

For more pics, check out USAID’s Facebook Album.

Three Things You Should Know about the U.S. Government’s Work in Haiti

submitted by Anna Gohmann

Responding to Haitians’ Questions A daily radio program for earthquake-affected communities recently broadcast its 100th program. “News You Can Use” (“Enfomasyon Nou Dwe Konnen”), produced by Internews and supported by USAID, reaches more than 3 million Haitians via 27 local radio stations and addresses topics including shelter and settlement; health; food, water and sanitation; and disaster risk, assessment and damage. The programs are based on listeners’ questions – 100 daily on average – submitted via text message and ongoing surveys.

Raising Public Awareness USAID, in coordination with the Haitian government, is supporting TV and radio public information campaigns aimed at addressing gender-based violence, security and health. “Stop the Rape” (“Kwape Kadejak”) PSAs are airing on large screens in many of Haiti’s spontaneous settlements during the World Cup and on other popular TV programs.  The PSAs, which are produced with USAID funding by the Pan-American Development Foundation and Population Services International, inform audiences about reporting and prosecuting rape and other violence; preventing HIV and malaria; and hygiene and family planning.

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REBUILDING SCHOOLS AND LIVES IN PORT-AU-PRINCE THROUGH THE CLEARS PROJECT

submitted by Anna Gohmann

Before - College St. Pierre

Before - College St. Pierre

Images of the first few weeks after the earthquake in Haiti are seared indelibly into all of our memories. But for USAID, the international community, and the Government of Haiti, our work continues even when there are no cable news cameras to capture it.

Alongside hundreds of other projects, we’re supporting CHF International to clear damaged buildings and help rebuild many of the hundreds of community schools that the earthquake destroyed in and around Port-au-Prince. CHF’s Emily Lynch shared the below story and photos of College St. Pierre, which collapsed in the earthquake and was cleared away through the USAID-funded CLEARS project:

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Natural Disasters Strike Guatemala

On May 26, 2010 heavy rainfall marked hurricane season’s first occurrence, Tropical Depression (TD) Agatha, began in Guatemala and El Salvador causing enormous sink holes in downtown Guatemala City and triggering floods and mudslides in two thirds of the country’s municipalities. Many public schools were converted into temporary shelters for the homeless.

Late on the afternoon of May 27 – Pacaya Volcano, one of the three active volcanoes, erupted 25 miles south of Guatemala City and spread ash, sand, gravel and fist-sized rocks for miles. The volcanic eruption covered the City with up to an inch of debris.

These incidents provide a good overview of what happens in a disaster: U.S. Ambassador to Guatemala Stephen G. McFarland issued a disaster declaration and requested emergency humanitarian assistance from USAID’s Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA). The United States was one of the first nations to pledge support with $100,000 that USAID’s Guatemala Mission used to locally purchase emergency relief supplies including food rations, fuel for emergency response vehicles and helicopter time to conduct need assessments. USAID/Guatemala is working with Guatemala’s National Emergency Commission and USAID/OFDA’s assessment team and food security program partners to assess the need for further assistance.

Within hours, a seven-person OFDA assessment team was on a plane. They work closely with U.S. Mission Disaster Relief Officer, Guatemala’s National Emergency Commission officials and other humanitarian groups to coordinate U.S. assistance. The Department of Defense’s U.S. Southern Command mobilized four helicopters and 40 troops that were brought in from Honduras to support evacuations, search and rescue efforts, and transport of emergency supplies to affected areas of Guatemala.

Every year, OFDA responds to more than 80 disasters at the request of countries around the world. OFDA operates on the principle that in fragile states, a disaster—even a small one—can drain already limited resources. That’s why the United States is there to help when people need it most.

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