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U.S. Helps Flood-Affected Farmers in Pakistan

As featured in Dipnote By: Alberto Rodriguez, Spokesperson at the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan During a ceremony held today, January 11, 2011, in Peshawar, officials from the government of Khyber Pakhtunkwa (KPk) and the United States marked the success of their partnership in providing high-quality wheat seeds to flood-affected farmers across the nation. The […]

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Picture of the Week

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Voting Begins in the Southern Sudan Referendum

On Sunday, voting began in the historic southern Sudan referendum. Read more >>

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From the Field

Updates from USAID Missions abroad. Read more >>

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Supporting Sustainable Livelihoods and Nutritious Meals

Food and nutrition is an important element across all cultures. In America there is a renewed sense of instilling good nutritional habits in children through the First Lady’s campaign against childhood obesity and the newly signed Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act. At USAID, we are concerned with not only feeding those in need around the world, but making sure they have access to healthy and nutritional meals on a regular basis, as well as a sustainable livelihood.   But for many people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) like Thabit Obed, a farmer from Uganda, managing one’s health is no easy task. The infection causes or aggravates malnutrition through reduced food intake, increased energy needs, and poor nutrient absorption. Malnutrition weakens the immune system, which can hasten the progression of HIV, increase susceptibility to opportunistic infections, and reduce the effectiveness of treatment. Since food and nutrition support is such a critical component of successful HIV/AIDS care and treatment, USAID has an invested program to help those in need.   Thabit is a recipient of support from the USAID-funded program, NuLife—Food and Nutrition Interventions for Uganda, a program managed by University Research Co., LLC (URC) that works to improve the health and nutritional status of people infected and affected by HIV/AIDS through integration of nutritional assessment, counseling, and support (NACS) into HIV/AIDS services.   In addition to producing and prescribing food, such as RUTAFA a ready-to-use therapeutic food, the program also works to provide opportunities for farmers in Uganda to expand their businesses.   Through a partnership with RECO Industries, Ltd, a local manufacturer which produces RUTAFA, Thabit was able to expand his small coffee bean farm and begin growing groundnuts.   Thabit, an active community volunteer, became one of more than 4,000 farmers to grow groundnuts as input for RUTAFA. He was trained to support other PLWHA and raise awareness about HIV testing, counseling and treatment.  Through this program and similar partnerships, USAID NuLife has been able to help ensure HIV positive individuals who have recovered from malnutrition through treatment with ready-to-use therapeutic food are being offered an opportunity to earn a living, support their families’ and maintain a healthy nutritional status.   USAID/Uganda designed a program that not only reaches HIV positive clients with critical services and supports local industry and individual farmers, but connects those clients to sustainable livelihood opportunities producing inputs for the very product, RUTAFA, which can support their health and that of their fellow PLWHA. Photo Credit: Mary Nabisere/NuLife

We are concerned with not only feeding those in need around the world, but making sure they have access to healthy and nutritious meals on a regular basis. Read more >>

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50th Anniversary: The Program of Scientific and Technological Cooperation

John Daily is the former director of the Office of Research. He worked for USAID from 1976 to 1997. He is now retired. Photo Credit: John Daly/USAID

The Program of Science and Technology Cooperation broke ground for USAID. Read more >>

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“Helping Babies Breathe” Global Development Alliance Results in New Innovative Company

Helping baby Shifa breathe in Bangladesh. Photo Credit: Tore Laerdal

The first sixty seconds can mean the difference between life and death for a newborn. Read more >>

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From Lab to Communities: Pioneering Low-Cost Approaches to Prevent Death and Treat Severe Illness

An Afghan nurse checks a crying newborn boy who was born that morning in the maternity ward of a hospital in Kabul on March 15, 2010.  Afghanistan has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world with an estimated 1,800 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births. The high birthrate places a heavy weight on a society where average per capita earnings are about USD700 a year. It is also a risk to mothers. Afghanistan is second only to Sierra Leone in maternal mortality rates, which run as high as 8 percent in some areas. Afghanistan has one of the world's highest fertility rates, averaging more than six babies per woman despite years of war and a severe lack of medical care. Awareness of, and access to, contraceptives remains low among many couples, with UNICEF estimating 10 percent of women use some form of birth control. Photo Credit: AFP PHOTO/BEHROUZ MEHRI

Today, we look at USAID’s seminal role in working to focus global attention on the issue of newborn survival. Read more >>

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Administrator Shah Speaks to Faith-Based Leaders at White House Feed the Future Event

Partnerships with faith-based and other nonprofit organizations that will help make Feed the Future a success. Read more >>

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Picture of the Week: Agricultural Boost in Vietnam

vietnam

Agricultural research helps farmers in Vietnam grow more rice and counteract the impacts of climate change on food security. Read more >>

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