A collaboration between USAID’s Center for Accelerating Innovation and Impact (CII) in the Global Health Bureau and the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University led to teams of business students from around the world competing on ways to reduce child deaths from pneumonia in Uganda.

The 11th annual Kellogg Biotech and Healthcare Case Competition brought together eleven teams representing nine business schools from the US, Canada, UK, and Mexico on January 25th in Chicago. This year’s winning team was from the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley and the runner-up from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.

The winning team from the Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley.

The winning team from the Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley. Credit: Jason Brown

Thirty-two teams applied to participate from twelve different schools around the world. The teams invited to compete had impressive credentials; many of the participants worked at global healthcare companies and several had medical degrees.

Judges of the event were pharmaceutical executives who evaluated the teams’ business-minded supply and demand solutions. Pneumonia is the largest killer of children in the developing world and can lead to death if not correctly and quickly diagnosed and treated appropriately.

“This is business education at its finest,” observed Tim Calkins, clinical professor of marketing at Kellogg and one of the directors of the case competition. “In this competition we have teams of students working to address a major global health issue. In the process, they are learning an enormous about global health, team dynamics and the power of business concepts.”

The case was developed over the course of several months by students and professors at Kellogg in close collaboration with CII. Students performed research and interviews throughout Uganda.

Professor Calkins and Kara Palamountain, Director of the Global Health Initiative at Kellogg, then wrote the case outlining the many barriers to increasing the use of antibiotics in a country with limited resources. At the end of the case students are asked to propose solutions from several options within a given budget to maximize lives saved.

“This case forced students to think both analytically and creatively. The challenges are significant; it isn’t a case with a simple answer,” said Calkins.

CII actively looks to support the already strong work across USAID’s Global Health Bureau by engaging a range of new thinkers and perspectives, many from the private sector. This event demonstrated the value of seeking out these new perspectives; many of the teams proposed promising, well-structured, and feasible solutions based on frameworks and analysis from their business school curricula. Some of the teams will be invited to present their proposals to the Pneumonia Working Group based at UNICEF to inform ongoing global scale-up efforts.

Kellogg Professor Tim Calkins discusses the case following the competition

Kellogg Professor Tim Calkins discusses the case following the competition

Exposing business students to the challenges and opportunities in these developing markets now will likely benefit them in their future healthcare careers. Many countries in Africa and South East Asia are among the fastest growing pharmaceutical markets in the world. Calkins noted, “I was delighted to use a pharmaceutical related case from Africa, since this is where some of the greatest needs and opportunities will be found in the healthcare world.”

In addition to this competition, the case will be a permanent teaching tool in a global health course at Kellogg.

Schools represented include:

  • Carlson School of Management, University of Minnesota
  • Desautels Faculty of Management, McGill University (Canada)
  • Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley
  • IPADE Business School (Mexico)
  • Judge Business School, University of Cambridge (UK)
  • Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University
  • Rutgers Business School
  • Stephen M. Ross School of Business, University of Michigan
  • University of Chicago Booth School of Business