Filmed in the northern coastal region of Tanzania, the short documentary “Healthy People, Healthy Environment showcases an innovative approach to development that combines efforts to conserve natural resources with reproductive health services and sustainable economic opportunities, such as clean cook stoves and seaweed farming.

In the film, three women from the Pangani and Bagamoyo districts – Rukia, Mahija, and Fidea – show how integrated population, health, and environment (PHE) projects empower them to help their families, their communities, and their environment.  Family planning and women’s empowerment are key to this long-term, holistic approach to the problems of environmental degradation and food insecurity.

“When you have a large number of children, there are two consequences: children can get malnutrition as a result of inadequate nutrition in their diet because the family is large. Second, when there are many children, the environment can be affected because it might be necessary for you to cut down trees in order to feed the children,” says Fidea Dastani Haule, a peer educator in Pangani district of Tanzania. “Therefore, the main thing we encourage is that a family plans their number of children so that you can adequately feed, clothe, and educate them.”

Watch Healthy People, Healthy Environment: Integrated Development in Tanzania here.

About the Film

“Healthy People, Healthy Environment” was produced by the Woodrow Wilson Center’s Environmental Change and Security Program with support from USAID’s Office of Population and Reproductive Health. To request a screening, please contact Sean Peoples at sean.peoples@wilsoncenter.org

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