The Press Trust of India reports on USAID’s announcement that Administrator Rajiv Shah, the “highest ranking Indian-American in the Obama Administration,” will travel to India and Myanmar in March. Shah is expected to “announce a major program to reduce preventable child deaths” in Mumbai.

USAID Administrator visits a small medical practice that delivers affordable health care to poor Burmese in Rangoon. March 7, 2013. Photo: Richard Nyberg/USAID

The Christian Science Monitor reports on the U.S. policy of not branding aid parcels aims to ensure they reach Syrians. USAID’s Nancy Lindborg said, “We are not putting flags on the aid so that it’s perhaps not as visible as it is in other situations. Our priority is to ensure that it reaches people and that it doesn’t create additional insecurity.”

The Wall Street Journal quoted Administrator Shah, saying “India is the most important country in the world when it comes to saving children’s lives and if they can achieve success and we can support it, the world will be well on its way to achieving an extraordinary and historic result of ensuring that every single child around the world lives to see their fifth birthday.”

The Times Of Central Asia reports that USAID has joined the fight against tuberculosis (TB) in Kyrgyzstan. USAID representative Carey Gordon stated, “Over the past decades, tuberculosis remains one of the relevant issues for Kyrgyzstan’s healthcare for many reasons, including socio-economic issues, and because of poorly established TB detection and treatment in the country.” In Jordan, the Women and Children’s Hospital in Mafraq is now double its size a year ago after a USAID renovation. It serves both Jordanians and Syrian refugees, and the hospital is one of 14 USAID renovated in the past three years throughout the country according to Zawya.