Today is Day 3 of our 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence.

USAID is highlighting the work of its Missions as part of its current campaign to raise widespread awareness about human trafficking and solicit innovative ideas to combat it at www.challengeslavery.org, where we launched a counter-trafficking Tech Contest today.

USAID is leading a U.S. government interagency process designed to help Afghanistan combat trafficking in persons. Through the Agency’s advisory efforts, the Afghan government has decided to establish its own steering committee tasked with addressing a crime that is becoming an increasingly significant problem in the country.  

According to the Department of State’s 2012 Trafficking in Persons Report, Afghanistan is a source, transit and destination country for men, women and children subjected to forced labor and sex trafficking. The majority of trafficking victims are children, and the International Organization for Migration reported in 2012 that younger boys and girls were increasingly subjected to forced labor in carpet-making factories and domestic servitude, and in commercial sexual exploitation, forced begging and transnational drug smuggling within Afghanistan as well as into Pakistan, Iran and Saudi Arabia.

Afghan children in Nuristan Province. Photo Credit: AFP Photo/Tauseef MUSTAFA

Some Afghan women and girls are subjected to forced prostitution and domestic servitude in Pakistan, Iran, and India, and there are reports of women and girls from the Philippines, Kyrgyzstan, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Iran, Tajikistan, and China being forced into prostitution in Afghanistan. Labor recruiting agencies lure foreign workers to Afghanistan, and traffickers lure Afghan villagers to Afghan cities or to India or Pakistan, and then sometimes subject them to forced labor or forced prostitution after their arrival.

As part of the U.S. government’s commitment, the U.S. embassy in Afghanistan, led by senior diplomats from the Department of State and USAID, meet on a regular basis with their Afghan counterparts, including a meeting earlier this week in Kabul.

U.S. Ambassador Hugo Llorens and USAID representatives met with the deputy Minister of Justice and representatives from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Labor and Social Affairs, and Women’s Affairs.  The meeting focused on efforts to draft a National Action Plan, and how USAID and the embassy can assist in this important endeavor to help protect the rights of Afghanistan’s most vulnerable citizens.

During the meeting, Mohammed Ayoob Erfani, the Director General for International Affairs at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, said the Afghan government is committed to progress in the area of combating trafficking in persons, and that he will commit resources to make sure that progress continues on this issue. The joint U.S.-Afghan efforts will focus on undertaking a national campaign designed to bring greater public awareness to this issue, and outreach efforts will be focused on educating civilians.